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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 9

of 'Peutz-Jeghers syndrome: Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis'

9
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Further observations on LKB1/STK11 status and cancer risk in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.
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Lim W, Hearle N, Shah B, Murday V, Hodgson SV, Lucassen A, Eccles D, Talbot I, Neale K, Lim AG, O'Donohue J, Donaldson A, Macdonald RC, Young ID, Robinson MH, Lee PW, Stoodley BJ, Tomlinson I, Alderson D, Holbrook AG, Vyas S, Swarbrick ET, Lewis AA, Phillips RK, Houlston RS
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Br J Cancer. 2003;89(2):308.
 
Germline mutations in the LKB1/STK11 tumour suppressor gene cause Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), a rare dominant disorder. In addition to typical hamartomatous gastrointestinal polyps and pigmented perioral lesions, PJS is associated with an increased risk of tumours at multiple sites. Follow-up information on carriers is limited and genetic heterogeneity makes counselling and management in PJS difficult. Here we report the analysis of the LKB1/STK11 locus in a series of 33 PJS families, and estimation of cancer risks in carriers and noncarriers. Germline mutations of LKB1/STK11 were identified in 52% of cases. This observation reinforces the hypothesis of a second PJS locus. In carriers of LKB1/STK11 mutations, the risk of cancer was markedly elevated. The risk of developing any cancer in carriers by age 65 years was 47% (95% CI: 27-73%) with elevated risks of both gastrointestinal and breast cancer. PJS with germline mutations in LKB1/STK11 are at a very high relative and absolute risk of multiple gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal cancers. To obtain precise estimates of risk associated with PJS requires further studies of genotype-phenotype especially with respect to LKB1/STK11 negative cases, as this group is likely to be heterogeneous.
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Section of Cancer Genetics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5NG, UK. wlim@icr.ac.uk
PMID