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Medline ® Abstracts for References 6-8

of 'Peutz-Jeghers syndrome: Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis'

6
TI
Peutz-Jeghers disease: most, but not all, families are compatible with linkage to 19p13.3.
AU
Olschwang S, Markie D, Seal S, Neale K, Phillips R, Cottrell S, Ellis I, Hodgson S, Zauber P, Spigelman A, Iwama T, Loff S, McKeown C, Marchese C, Sampson J, Davies S, Talbot I, Wyke J, Thomas G, Bodmer W, Hemminki A, Avizienyte E, de la Chapelle A, Aaltonen L, Tomlinson I
SO
J Med Genet. 1998;35(1):42.
 
A locus for Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) was recently mapped to chromosome 19p13.3. Each of 12 families studied was compatible with linkage to the marker D19S886. We have analysed 20 further families and found that the majority of these are consistent with a PJS gene on 19p13.3. Three families were, however, unlinked to 19p13.3 and none of the available PJS polyps from these families showed allele loss at D19S886. There were no obvious clinicopathological or ethnic differences between the 19p13.3 linked and unlinked families. There appears, therefore, to be a major PJS locus on chromosome 19p13.3 and the possibility exists of a minor locus (or loci) elsewhere.
AD
INSERM U-434, CEPH, Paris, France.
PMID
7
TI
Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is caused by mutations in a novel serine threonine kinase.
AU
Jenne DE, Reimann H, Nezu J, Friedel W, Loff S, Jeschke R, Müller O, Back W, Zimmer M
SO
Nat Genet. 1998;18(1):38.
 
Peutz-Jeghers (PJ) syndrome is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by melanocytic macules of the lips, multiple gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyps and an increased risk for various neoplasms, including gastrointestinal cancer. The PJ gene was recently mapped to chromosome 19p13.3 by linkage analysis, with the highest lod score at marker D19S886. In a distance of 190 kb proximal to D19S886, we identified and characterized a novel human gene encoding the serine threonine kinase STK11. In a three-generation PJ family, we found an STK11 allele with a deletion of exons 4 and 5 and an inversion of exons 6 and 7 segregating with the disease. Sequence analysis of STK11 exons in four unrelated PJ patients has identified three nonsense and one acceptor splice site mutations. All five germline mutations are predicted to disrupt the function of the kinase domain. We conclude that germline mutations in STK11, probably in conjunction with acquired genetic defects of the second allele in somatic cells, cause the manifestations of PJ syndrome.
AD
Department of Neuroimmunology, Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Martinsried, Germany. djenne@alf.biochem.mpg.de
PMID
8
TI
A serine/threonine kinase gene defective in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.
AU
Hemminki A, Markie D, Tomlinson I, Avizienyte E, Roth S, Loukola A, Bignell G, Warren W, Aminoff M, Höglund P, Järvinen H, Kristo P, Pelin K, RidanpääM, Salovaara R, Toro T, Bodmer W, Olschwang S, Olsen AS, Stratton MR, de la Chapelle A, Aaltonen LA
SO
Nature. 1998;391(6663):184.
 
Studies of hereditary cancer syndromes have contributed greatly to our understanding of molecular events involved in tumorigenesis. Here we investigate the molecular background of the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), a rare hereditary disease in which there is predisposition to benign and malignant tumours of many organ systems. A locus for this condition was recently assigned to chromosome 19p. We have identified truncating germline mutations in a gene residing on chromosome 19p in multiple individuals affected by PJS. This previously identified but unmapped gene, LKB1, has strong homology to a cytoplasmic Xenopus serine/threonine protein kinase XEEK1, and weaker similarity to many other protein kinases. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is therefore the first cancer-susceptibility syndrome to be identified that is due to inactivating mutations in a protein kinase.
AD
Department of Medical Genetics, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Finland.
PMID