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Pediatric advanced life support (PALS)

Authors
Eric Fleegler, MD, MPH
Monica Kleinman, MD
Section Editor
Susan B Torrey, MD
Deputy Editor
James F Wiley, II, MD, MPH

INTRODUCTION

This topic will discuss the advanced components of recognition and treatment of respiratory failure, shock, cardiopulmonary failure, and cardiac arrhythmias in children.

Basic life support in children and guidelines for cardiac resuscitation in adults are discussed separately. (See "Pediatric basic life support for healthcare providers" and "Advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) in adults".)

BACKGROUND

The American Heart Association (AHA) PALS program provides a structured approach to the assessment and treatment of the critically ill pediatric patient [1,2]. The AHA guidelines for pediatric resuscitation were updated in 2015 to reflect advances and research in clinical care using new evidence from a variety of sources ranging from large clinical trials to animal models.

The PALS content includes:

Overview of assessment

                              

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Literature review current through: Aug 2016. | This topic last updated: Mar 24, 2016.
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References
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Topic Outline

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