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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 44

of 'Pathology of exocrine pancreatic neoplasms'

44
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Malignant pancreatic tumors: incidence and outcome in 58 pediatric patients.
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Perez EA, Gutierrez JC, Koniaris LG, Neville HL, Thompson WR, Sola JE
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J Pediatr Surg. 2009;44(1):197.
 
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to examine current incidence trends and outcomes for children with pancreatic malignancies.
METHODS: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry (1973-2004) was examined for pediatric patients with pancreatic malignancies (up to 19 years of age).
RESULTS: Malignant pancreatic neoplasms were identified in 58 patients. Females outnumbered males 1.9 to 1 (38 vs 20) for an age population-adjusted incidence of 0.021 and 0.015 per 100,000. Overall, 70% (n = 41) of patients were white. Asians had the highest incidence. Tumors were classified as exocrine (n = 31, 53.4%), endocrine (n = 19, 32.8%), or sarcomas (n = 5, 8.6%). Exocrine tumors included pancreatoblastoma (n = 10), solid-cystic tumor (SCT) (n = 10), ductal adenocarcinoma (DA) (n = 7), and acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) (n = 4). All SCTs and 80% of pancreatoblastomas were seen in females, whereas males had a higher incidence of DA 71% (P = .036). Ductal adenocarcinoma, SCT, acinar cell carcinoma, sarcomas, and endocrine tumors were more common in children older than 10 years, whereas pancreatoblastoma was more common in younger children (P = .045). Almost half of patients (n = 25) presented with distant metastasis; of these, 44% were endocrine tumors. Survival was significantly greater for female patients (P = .004) and for those who had surgery (P = .001) by both univariate and multivariate analysis. There was a significant difference in tumor type 15-year survival with DA having the worst (23%) and SCT the best (100%).
CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric pancreatic neoplasms are uncommon and carry a variable prognosis. Both female sex and surgery were independent predictors of improved survival.
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DeWitt Daughtry Family Department of Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, FL 33136, USA.
PMID