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Medline ® Abstracts for References 82,84

of 'Overview of the treatment of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT)'

82
TI
A meta-analysis of bed rest versus early ambulation in the management of pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis, or both.
AU
Aissaoui N, Martins E, Mouly S, Weber S, Meune C
SO
Int J Cardiol. 2009 Sep;137(1):37-41. Epub 2008 Aug 8.
 
BACKGROUND: Bed rest is often recommended as part of the management of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), though this recommendation is not clearly evidence-based.
METHODS: Using the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, and Embase, this meta-analysis considered all randomized studies and prospective registries that compared the outcomes of patients with DVT, PE, or both, managed with bed rest versus early ambulation, in addition to anticoagulation. For each study, data regarding the incidence of new PE, new or progression of DVT, and death from all causes, were used to calculate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).
RESULTS: The 5 studies retained in this analysis included a total of 3048 patients. When compared to bed rest, early ambulation was not associated with a higher incidence of a new PE (RR 1.03; 95% CI 0.65-1.63; p=0.90). Furthermore, early ambulation was associated with a trend toward a lower incidence of new PE and new or progression of DVT than bed rest (RR 0.79; 95% CI 0.55-1.14; p=0.21) and lower incidence of new PE and overall mortality (RR 0.79; 95% CI 0.402-1.56; p=0.50).
CONCLUSIONS: Compared with bed rest, early ambulation of patients with DVT, PE or both, was not associated with a higher risk of progression of DVT, new PE or death. This meta-analysis does not support the systematic recommendation of bed rest as part of the early management of patients presenting with DVT, PE of both.
AD
Department of Cardiology, Cochin Hospital, AP-HP, RenéDescartes Paris V University, Paris, France.
PMID
84
TI
Management of venous thromboembolism: a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians and the American Academy of Family Physicians.
AU
Snow V, Qaseem A, Barry P, Hornbake ER, Rodnick JE, Tobolic T, Ireland B, Segal JB, Bass EB, Weiss KB, Green L, Owens DK, American College of Physicians, American Academy of Family Physicians Panel on Deep Venous Thrombosis/Pulmonary Embolism
SO
Ann Intern Med. 2007;146(3):204. Epub 2007 Jan 29.
 
Venous thromboembolism is a common condition affecting 7.1 persons per 10,000 person-years among community residents. Incidence rates for venous thromboembolism are higher in men and African Americans and increase substantially with age. It is critical to treat deep venous thrombosis at an early stage to avoid development of further complications, such as pulmonary embolism or recurrent deep venous thrombosis. The target audience for this guideline is all clinicians caring for patients who have been given a diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. The target patient population is patients receiving a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism or lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis.
AD
American College of Physicians, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19106, USA.
PMID