UpToDate
Official reprint from UpToDate®
www.uptodate.com ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.

Medline ® Abstract for Reference 149

of 'Overview of the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and adolescents'

149
TI
Survival after relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: impact of site and time to first relapse--the Children's Cancer Group Experience.
AU
Gaynon PS, Qu RP, Chappell RJ, Willoughby ML, Tubergen DG, Steinherz PG, Trigg ME
SO
Cancer. 1998;82(7):1387.
 
BACKGROUND: Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the single most common childhood malignancy. Despite substantial improvements in therapy, cases in which relapse occurs are still more common than newly diagnosed cases of many other childhood cancers. The survival of patients who relapse despite improved therapy continues to be of interest.
METHODS: One thousand one hundred forty-four relapses and 28 second malignant neoplasms were identified among the 3712 eligible patients enrolled on Children's Cancer Group trials between 1983 and 1989. The details of treatment after relapse were not accessible. Subsequent secondary event free survival and overall survival were examined by the site of and time to initial relapse. A variety of potential prognostic factors were examined employing the log rank statistic and Wilcoxon regression model.
RESULTS: Rates of 6-year survival (+/- standard error) after isolated bone marrow, isolated central nervous system (CNS), and isolated testis relapse were 20%+/-2%, 48%+/-4%, and 70%+/-5%, respectively. Rates of survival after isolated bone marrow relapse at 0-17 months, 18-35 months, and after 36 months were 6%+/-2%, 11%+/-2%, and 43%+/-4%, respectively. Rates of survival after isolated CNS relapse at 0-17 months, 18-35 months, and after 36 months were 33%+/-4%, 59%+/-5%, and 72%+/-8%, respectively. Rates of survival after isolated testis relapse at 0-17 months, 18-35 months, and after 36 months were 52%+/-11%, 57%+/-10%, and 81%+/-5%, respectively. Rates of survival after combined bone marrow and CNS or testis relapse at 0-17 months, 18-35 months, and after 36 months were 9%+/-5%, 11%+/-6%, and 49%+/-7%, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: Substantial survival at 6 years is evident among several subsets of this unselected group of heterogeneously treated children, namely, those with isolated or combined bone marrow relapse after 36 months and those with isolated extramedullary relapse at any time. Second malignant neoplasms are rare thus far.
AD
University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA.
PMID