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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 64

of 'Overview of spirituality in palliative care'

64
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Restoration and re-creation: spirituality in the lives of healthcare professionals.
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Puchalski CM, Guenther M
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Curr Opin Support Palliat Care. 2012 Jun;6(2):254-8.
 
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The clinician-patient relationship is essential to the practice of person-centered care. This healing relationship can present challenges to clinicians when working with patients who suffer. Clinicians today are looking for ways to deal with the stress of care-giving and to find greater meaning in their professional lives.
RECENT FINDINGS: Professional guidelines recognize that medicine, nursing and other healthcare professions are vocations, not jobs. Reports indicate that physicians and other clinicians feel the current healthcare environment is too business-like yet, patient relationships continue to be the primary source of satisfaction for many clinicians. The relationships can be rewarding but also stressful. Spirituality is proposed as a way for clinicians to reconnect with their professional roots to serve those who suffer. Resources are suggested that might enable clinicians to find greater meaning in their profession.
SUMMARY: Professional development should address spiritual development especially as it relates to the healthcare professional's sense of calling to their profession, the basis of relationship-centered care, and the provision of compassionate care.
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The George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health, The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington DC, USA. cpuchals@gwu.edu
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