UpToDate
Official reprint from UpToDate®
www.uptodate.com ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.

Medline ® Abstract for Reference 47

of 'Overview of intestinal ischemia in adults'

47
TI
Measuring platelet aggregation to estimate small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.
AU
Arakawa K, Takeyoshi I, Muraoka M, Matsumoto K, Morishita Y
SO
J Surg Res. 2004;122(2):195.
 
BACKGROUND: The success of intestinal transplantation is affected by the extreme susceptibility of the small bowel to ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Currently, there is no quick, convenient method to estimate the extent of small bowel I/R injury. Although histological evaluation is reliable and accurate, it takes too long to allow favorable intervention in I/R injury. I/R causes the production of arachidonic acid products, oxygen free radicals, cytokines, and nitric oxide, which affect platelet function.
OBJECTIVE: This study determined whether measuring platelet aggregation is useful for evaluating small bowel I/R injury.
METHODS: Eighteen mongrel dogs were divided into three groups. In group A both the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and vein (SMV) were occluded for 120 min. In group B the SMA was occluded for 60 min. Group C underwent a sham operation. Platelet aggregation was measured using a whole blood aggregometer (WBA analyzer), which readily handles small samples. Histological examination was performed. The correlation between platelet aggregation and histology was analyzed.
RESULTS: Platelet aggregation was similar in all groups before reperfusion. After reperfusion, platelet aggregation was significantly lower in group A than in groups B and C (P<0.05), and mucosal damage was most severe in group A (P<0.05). After 1 and 3 h of reperfusion, there was a significant negative correlation between platelet aggregation and histological damage.
CONCLUSIONS: Measuring platelet aggregation is rapid, easy, and useful for evaluating small bowel I/R injury.
AD
Second Department of Surgery, Gunma University School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma, Japan.
PMID