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Overview of eye injuries in the emergency department

Author
Matthew F Gardiner, MD
Section Editors
Susan B Torrey, MD
Jonathan Trobe, MD
Deputy Editor
James F Wiley, II, MD, MPH

INTRODUCTION

This topic provides an overview of eye injuries. The approach to eye injuries and emergent evaluation and management of open globe injuries are discussed separately:

(See "Approach to eye injuries in the emergency department".)

(See "Open globe injuries: Emergent evaluation and initial management".)

APPROACH

Eye injury includes trauma to the eye (ocular trauma), the orbit (periocular trauma), or both. The initial approach to eye injury, as with any trauma, must involve careful triage. Because the eyes are located near vital the intracranial space, the cervical spine, and the airway, life-threatening injuries involving these structures need to be considered prior to assessing periocular and ocular damage. (See "Initial management of trauma in adults" and "Trauma management: Approach to the unstable child".)

Once life-threatening injuries are excluded or identified and treated, the emergency clinician should identify threats to vision using a focused history and an organized approach (algorithm 1). A systematic approach to the evaluation of patients with eye injuries will lead to the rapid recognition and treatment of vision-threatening conditions including caustic eye exposures, orbital compartment syndrome (OCS), and open-globe injuries. (See "Approach to eye injuries in the emergency department", section on 'Approach'.)

                     

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Literature review current through: Nov 2016. | This topic last updated: Mon Apr 11 00:00:00 GMT+00:00 2016.
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References
Top
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Topic Outline

GRAPHICS