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Overview of antiretroviral agents used to treat HIV

Author
Courtney V Fletcher, PharmD
Section Editor
John G Bartlett, MD
Deputy Editor
Jennifer Mitty, MD, MPH

INTRODUCTION

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens used to treat individuals with HIV infection have led to dramatic reductions in morbidity and mortality. Drug selection could potentially include at least 25 antiretroviral medications available in six major classes (table 1). However, only a small proportion of these agents are recommended. For most individuals, an ART regimen consists of a dual nucleoside combination plus a third agent from a different class.

This topic will provide an overview of the different antiretroviral agents used to treat HIV. Topic reviews that discuss the safety of these agents in pregnancy, when to initiate therapy, how to choose a regimen, and antiretroviral resistance are presented elsewhere:

(See "Safety and dosing of antiretroviral medications in pregnancy".)

(See "Selecting antiretroviral regimens for the treatment-naïve HIV-infected patient".)

(See "When to initiate antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients".)

                               

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Literature review current through: Nov 2016. | This topic last updated: Thu Sep 29 00:00:00 GMT+00:00 2016.
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