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Medline ® Abstracts for References 7-9

of 'Oral food challenges for diagnosis and management of food allergies'

7
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Conducting an Oral Food Challenge to Peanut in an Infant.
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Bird JA, Groetch M, Allen KJ, Bock SA, Leonard S, Nowak-Wegrzyn AH, Sicherer S, Clark A, Fleischer DM, Venter C, Vickery B, Young MC
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J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2017;5(2):301. Epub 2016 Nov 9.
 
Results from the Learning Early About Peanut trial and its follow-up study suggest that early peanut introduction in the diets of high-risk infants may prevent the development of peanut allergy. Allergy organizations around the world released a unified statement, the Consensus Communication on Early Peanut Introduction and the Prevention of Peanut Allergy in High Risk Infants, in response to results from the Learning Early About Peanut trial, which recommends early introduction of peanut into the diet of those children at greatest risk of development of peanut allergy. As a result, it is expected that practicing allergists will experience an increased demand to perform an oral food challenge (OFC) in infants. Allergists often perform OFCs; however, conducting an OFC in an infant creates unique circumstances that have not been considered in previously published OFC guideline documents. The purpose of this workgroup report is to provide guidance to practitioners regarding the proper approach for conducting a peanut challenge in an infant.
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Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Tex; Food Allergy Center, Children's Medical Center, Dallas, Tex. Electronic address: drew.bird@utsouthwestern.edu.
PMID
8
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Oral food challenges in children with a diagnosis of food allergy.
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Fleischer DM, Bock SA, Spears GC, Wilson CG, Miyazawa NK, Gleason MC, Gyorkos EA, Murphy JR, Atkins D, Leung DY
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J Pediatr. 2011;158(4):578. Epub 2010 Oct 28.
 
OBJECTIVE: To assess the outcome of oral food challenges in patients placed on elimination diets based primarily on positive serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) immunoassay results.
STUDY DESIGN: This is a retrospective chart review of 125 children aged 1-19 years (median age, 4 years) evaluated between January 2007 and August 2008 for IgE-mediated food allergy at National Jewish Health and who underwent an oral food challenge. Clinical history, prick skin test results, and serum allergen-specific IgE test results were obtained.
RESULTS: The data were summarized for food avoidance and oral food challenge results. Depending on the reason for avoidance, 84%-93% of the foods being avoided were returned to the diet after an oral food challenge, indicating that the vast majority of foods that had been restricted could be tolerated at discharge.
CONCLUSIONS: In the absence of anaphylaxis, the primary reliance on serum food-specific IgE testing to determine the need for a food elimination diet is not sufficient, especially in children with atopic dermatitis. In those circumstances, oral food challenges may be indicated to confirm food allergy status.
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Department of Pediatrics, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO 80206, USA.
PMID
9
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Does severity of low-dose, double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges reflect severity of allergic reactions to peanut in the community?
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Hourihane JO, Grimshaw KE, Lewis SA, Briggs RA, Trewin JB, King RM, Kilburn SA, Warner JO
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Clin Exp Allergy. 2005;35(9):1227.
 
BACKGROUND: The severity of allergic reactions to food appears to be affected by many interacting factors. It is uncertain whether challenge-based reactions reflect the severity of past reactions or can predict future risk.
OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationship of a subject's clinical history of past reactions to the severity of reaction elicited by a low-dose, double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) with peanut.
METHOD: Cross-sectional questionnaire assessment of community-based allergic reactions and low-dose DBPCFC in self-selected peanut-allergic subjects. Reaction severity was assessed using a novel scoring system, taking account of the dose of allergen ingested.
RESULTS: Forty subjects (15 males, 23 children, 23 asthmatics by history) were studied. Only the most recent community reaction predicted the severity of reaction in the DBPCFC, but even this association was weak (r=0.37, P=0.03). Peanut-specific IgE (PsIgE) and skin prick test (SPT) weal size were not associated with community score but PsIgE level correlated well with the challenge score (r=0.6, P=0.001). Asthma did not affect the eliciting dose or challenge score directly but the association of PsIgE and challenge score was stronger in those without asthma (r=0.72, P=0.001) than in those with asthma (r=0.48, P=0.02).
CONCLUSIONS: The scoring system developed appears to improve the sensitivity of assessment of reactions induced by DBPCFC. This is the first prospective study showing an association between PsIgE levels and clinical reactivity in DBPCFC, an effect that is more pronounced in non-asthmatics. This finding has important implications for the clinical care of subjects with food allergy. There is a poor correlation between the severity of reported reactions in the community and the severity of reaction elicited during low-dose DBPCFC with peanut.
AD
Allergy&Inflammation Research (Child Health), University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. J.Hourihane@ucc.ie
PMID