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Medline ® Abstracts for References 11-14

of 'Oral food challenges for diagnosis and management of food allergies'

11
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Eosinophilic esophagitis: a 10-year experience in 381 children.
AU
Liacouras CA, Spergel JM, Ruchelli E, Verma R, Mascarenhas M, Semeao E, Flick J, Kelly J, Brown-Whitehorn T, Mamula P, Markowitz JE
SO
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2005;3(12):1198.
 
BACKGROUND& AIMS: Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a disorder characterized by a severe, isolated eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus unresponsive to aggressive acid blockade but responsive to the removal of dietary antigens. We present information relating to our 10-year experience in children diagnosed with EoE.
METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study between January 1, 1994, and January 1, 2004, to evaluate all patients diagnosed with EoE. Clinical symptoms, demographic data, endoscopic findings, and the results of various treatment regimens were collected and evaluated.
RESULTS: A total of 381 patients (66% male, age 9.1 +/- 3.1 years) were diagnosed with EoE: 312 presented with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux; 69 presented with dysphagia. Endoscopically, 68% of patients had a visually abnormal esophagus; 32% had a normal-appearing esophagus despite a severe histologic esophageal eosinophilia. The average number of esophageal eosinophils (per 400 x high power field) proximally and distally were 23.3 +/- 10.5 and 38.7 +/- 13.3, respectively. Corticosteroids significantly improved clinical symptoms and esophageal histology; however, upon their withdrawal, the symptoms and esophageal eosinophilia recurred. Dietary restriction or complete dietary elimination using an amino acid-based formula significantly improved both the clinical symptoms and esophageal histology in 75 and 172 patients, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: Medications such as corticosteroids are effective; however, upon withdrawal, EoE recurs. The removal of dietary antigens significantly improved clinical symptoms and esophageal histology in 98% of patients.
AD
Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. liacouras@email.chop.edu
PMID
12
TI
Oral food challenges in children with a diagnosis of food allergy.
AU
Fleischer DM, Bock SA, Spears GC, Wilson CG, Miyazawa NK, Gleason MC, Gyorkos EA, Murphy JR, Atkins D, Leung DY
SO
J Pediatr. 2011;158(4):578.
 
OBJECTIVE: To assess the outcome of oral food challenges in patients placed on elimination diets based primarily on positive serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) immunoassay results.
STUDY DESIGN: This is a retrospective chart review of 125 children aged 1-19 years (median age, 4 years) evaluated between January 2007 and August 2008 for IgE-mediated food allergy at National Jewish Health and who underwent an oral food challenge. Clinical history, prick skin test results, and serum allergen-specific IgE test results were obtained.
RESULTS: The data were summarized for food avoidance and oral food challenge results. Depending on the reason for avoidance, 84%-93% of the foods being avoided were returned to the diet after an oral food challenge, indicating that the vast majority of foods that had been restricted could be tolerated at discharge.
CONCLUSIONS: In the absence of anaphylaxis, the primary reliance on serum food-specific IgE testing to determine the need for a food elimination diet is not sufficient, especially in children with atopic dermatitis. In those circumstances, oral food challenges may be indicated to confirm food allergy status.
AD
Department of Pediatrics, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO 80206, USA.
PMID
13
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Does severity of low-dose, double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges reflect severity of allergic reactions to peanut in the community?
AU
Hourihane JO, Grimshaw KE, Lewis SA, Briggs RA, Trewin JB, King RM, Kilburn SA, Warner JO
SO
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005;35(9):1227.
 
BACKGROUND: The severity of allergic reactions to food appears to be affected by many interacting factors. It is uncertain whether challenge-based reactions reflect the severity of past reactions or can predict future risk.
OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationship of a subject's clinical history of past reactions to the severity of reaction elicited by a low-dose, double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) with peanut.
METHOD: Cross-sectional questionnaire assessment of community-based allergic reactions and low-dose DBPCFC in self-selected peanut-allergic subjects. Reaction severity was assessed using a novel scoring system, taking account of the dose of allergen ingested.
RESULTS: Forty subjects (15 males, 23 children, 23 asthmatics by history) were studied. Only the most recent community reaction predicted the severity of reaction in the DBPCFC, but even this association was weak (r=0.37, P=0.03). Peanut-specific IgE (PsIgE) and skin prick test (SPT) weal size were not associated with community score but PsIgE level correlated well with the challenge score (r=0.6, P=0.001). Asthma did not affect the eliciting dose or challenge score directly but the association of PsIgE and challenge score was stronger in those without asthma (r=0.72, P=0.001) than in those with asthma (r=0.48, P=0.02).
CONCLUSIONS: The scoring system developed appears to improve the sensitivity of assessment of reactions induced by DBPCFC. This is the first prospective study showing an association between PsIgE levels and clinical reactivity in DBPCFC, an effect that is more pronounced in non-asthmatics. This finding has important implications for the clinical care of subjects with food allergy. There is a poor correlation between the severity of reported reactions in the community and the severity of reaction elicited during low-dose DBPCFC with peanut.
AD
Allergy&Inflammation Research (Child Health), University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. J.Hourihane@ucc.ie
PMID
14
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Recurrent peanut allergy.
AU
Busse PJ, Nowak-Wegrzyn AH, Noone SA, Sampson HA, Sicherer SH
SO
N Engl J Med. 2002;347(19):1535.
 
AD
PMID