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Medline ® Abstracts for References 5-9

of 'Nonepileptic paroxysmal disorders in children'

5
TI
Basilar migraine in childhood.
AU
Hockaday JM
SO
Dev Med Child Neurol. 1979;21(4):455.
 
The incidence and different presentations of basilar migraine are described in a series of 132 children (80 boys, 52 girls) presenting with recurring headache considered to be migraine. Basilar migraine occurred in 29 children, and a further 18 had minor symptoms compatible with but not diagnostic of this form. The course was most often benign, with infrequent, fragmentary attacks and little disability. Rarely, attacks were both severe and frequent, but even then the clinical pattern and outcome usually followed a similar course. Only two children (with the youngest ages at onset) have serious disability, with mental slowing and (in one) permanent neurological sequelae. The relationship between basilar migraine and the syndrome of alternating hemiplegia of infancy is discussed. Because of the limited present knowledge, it is suggested that rigid definitions of migraine should be avoided.
AD
PMID
6
TI
Transient global amnesia in childhood.
AU
Jensen TS
SO
Dev Med Child Neurol. 1980;22(5):654.
 
Transient global amnesia, a brief disorder of recent memory affecting middle-aged and elderly patients, is probably caused by transient ischaemia of the hippocampal regions and other parts of the limbic system related to memory functions. A 13-year-old boy with a single episode of transient global amnesia and a three-year history of recurrent headache is described. It is suggested that some acute confusional states encountered in children with migraine may represent obscured instances of transient global amnesia, and that a brief vasoconstriction of the arteries supplying hippocampal structures is probably responsible for both conditions.
AD
PMID
7
TI
Acute confusional migraine: variant of transient global amnesia.
AU
Sheth RD, Riggs JE, Bodensteiner JB
SO
Pediatr Neurol. 1995;12(2):129.
 
Acute confusional migraine in children and transient global amnesia in adults share a number of similar clinical manifestations. Acute confusional migraine in 6 children (mean age: 11.7 years; range: 7.5-17 years) was characterized by transient episodes of amnesia and acute confusion lasting 1-12 hours. Episodes were preceded by headache and vomiting in 4 patients. In 2 patients acute confusional migraine was the initial symptom. A history of preceding trivial head injury was reported in 3 patients and migraine in 4. Urine and serum drug screens were negative. Cerebral imaging studies and interictal electroencephalograms were normal. Ictal electroencephalograms in 3 patients revealed diffuse or bioccipital delta wave slowing. Recurrent episodes of acute confusional migraine occurred in 2 children during 1-3 years of follow-up. The clinical manifestations of acute confusional migraine in this series of children are similar to those reported in transient global amnesia. The similarity of the clinical manifestations of acute confusional migraine in children and transient global amnesia in adults suggests that these disorders may share a common pathophysiology.
AD
Department of Neurology, West Virginia University School of Medicine; Morgantown, USA.
PMID
8
TI
Juvenile head trauma syndromes and their relationship to migraine.
AU
Haas DC, Pineda GS, Lourie H
SO
Arch Neurol. 1975;32(11):727.
 
The clinical spectrum of juvenile head trauma syndromes was derived from an analysis of 50 attacks in 25 patients. Attacks were grouped into four clinical types: (1) hemiparesis; (2) somnolence, irritability, and vomiting; (3) blindness; and (4) brain stem signs. Our evidence shows that these four types are different manifestations of a common underlying process. All attacks followed mild head trauma after a latent interval, generally of one to ten minutes. Forty of the 50 attacks occurred in patients under 14 years of age. Full recovery occurred after a variable time in all but one instance. This patient, and one other, had an angiographically demonstrable occlusion of a branch of the middle cerebral artery. In clinical and laboratory features, these attacks resemble classical migraine and presumably have a similar underlying mechanism.
AD
PMID
9
TI
The Alice in Wonderland syndrome in juvenile migraine.
AU
Golden GS
SO
Pediatrics. 1979;63(4):517.
 
Two children are reported who had recurrent attacks of impairment of time sense, body image, and visual analysis of the environment. These occurred with a clear state of consciousness and in the absence of any evidence of an encephalitic process, seizures, drug ingestion, or psychiatric illness. Both children had recurrent headaches; one was clearly migrainous. There was a family history of migraine in both cases. These children represent examples of the Alice in Wonderland syndrome in juvenile migraine.
AD
PMID