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Medline ® Abstracts for References 1,7-9

of 'Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis'

1
TI
Non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis: clinicopathologic correlations.
AU
Deppisch LM, Fayemi AO
SO
Am Heart J. 1976;92(6):723.
 
Sixty-five cases of nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) were discovered at autopsy during a 10 year period--an incidence of 1.6 per cent in the adult autopsy population. In 51 cases, one or more malignant neoplasms were associated; adenocarcinoma represented the most frequent histologic type of related neoplasm. Coagulation abnormalities suggestive of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) were present in 18.5 per cent of the cases. It is possible that both the valvular and peripheral intravascular thromboses in at least some cases of NBTE represent the abnormal coagulation of DIC. Arterial thrombosis with infarction occurred in many peripheral organs. Splenic and renal were most frequent, but cerebral and cardiac consequences were the most significant.
AD
PMID
7
TI
Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis in cancer patients: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment.
AU
el-Shami K, Griffiths E, Streiff M
SO
Oncologist. 2007 May;12(5):518-23.
 
Thrombophilia is a well-described consequence of cancer and its treatment. The pathogenesis of this phenomenon is complex and multifactorial. Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) is a serious and potentially underdiagnosed manifestation of this prothrombotic state that can cause substantial morbidity in affected patients, most notably recurrent or multiple ischemic cerebrovascular strokes. Diagnosis of NBTE requires a high degree of clinical suspicion as well as the judicious use of two-dimensional echocardiography to document the presence of valvular thrombi. In the absence of contraindications to therapy, treatment consists of systemic anticoagulation, which may ameliorate symptoms and prevent further thromboembolic episodes, as well as control of the underlying malignancy whenever possible.
AD
The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. kelsham1@jhmi.edu
PMID
8
TI
Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (marantic endocarditis) in cancer patients.
AU
Mazokopakis EE, Syros PK, Starakis IK
SO
Cardiovasc Hematol Disord Drug Targets. 2010 Jun;10(2):84-6.
 
The term nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE), or marantic endocarditis, refers to a spectrum of lesions ranging from microscopic aggregates of platelets to large vegetations on previously undamaged heart valves (most often aortic and mitral) in the absence of a bloodstream bacterial infection. NBTE is a rare condition often associated with hypercoagulable states or advanced malignancy such as adenocarcinomas. In this article, the pathogenesis, incidence, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of NBTE in cancer patients are reviewed.
AD
Department of Internal Medicine, Naval Hospital of Crete, 73 200 Chania, Crete, Greece. emazokopakis@yahoo.gr
PMID
9
TI
Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis: a review.
AU
Lopez JA, Ross RS, Fishbein MC, Siegel RJ
SO
Am Heart J. 1987 Mar;113(3):773-84.
 
The entity of NBTE is reviewed in this article. Historic aspects, epidemiology, and pathogenesis are discussed. The clinicopathologic findings are emphasized as well as the potential for antemortem diagnosis and therapy. NBTE is diagnosed infrequently before death. Clinical suspicion is aroused in patients with an underlying process such as malignancy, DIC, or a spectrum of other diseases and evidence of pulmonary and/or systemic embolization. Systemic infection must be excluded. Two-dimensional echocardiography can be utilized to confirm the diagnosis. Anticoagulation therapy with heparin may prevent embolization.
AD
PMID