Medline ® Abstracts for References 1,2

of 'Neonatal lupus'

1
TI
Pregnancy outcomes in patients with autoimmune diseases and anti-Ro/SSA antibodies.
AU
Brucato A, Cimaz R, Caporali R, Ramoni V, Buyon J
SO
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2011;40(1):27.
 
Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies are associated with neonatal lupus (congenital heart block (CHB), neonatal transient skin rash, hematological and hepatic abnormalities), but do not negatively affects other gestational outcomes, and the general outcome of these pregnancies is now good, when followed by experienced multidisciplinary teams. The prevalence of CHB, defined as an atrioventricular block diagnosed in utero, at birth, or within the neonatal period (0-27 days after birth), in the offspring of an anti-Ro/SSA-positive women is 1-2%, of neonatal lupus rash around 10-20%, while laboratory abnormalities in asymptomatic babies can be detected in up to 27% of cases. The risk of recurrence of CHB is ten times higher. Most of the mothers are asymptomatic at delivery and are identified only by the birth of an affected child. Half of these asymptomatic women develop symptoms of a rheumatic disease, most commonly arthralgias and xerophtalmia, but few develop lupus nephritis. A standard therapy for CHB is still matter of investigation, although fluorinated corticosteroids have been reported to be effective for associated cardiomyopathy. Serial echocardiograms and obstetric sonograms, performed at least every 1-2 weeks starting from the 16th week of gestational age, are recommended in anti-Ro/SSA-positive pregnant women to detect early fetal abnormalities that might be a target of preventive therapy.
AD
Internal Medicine, Ospedali Riuniti, Largo Barozzi, Bergamo, Italy. albrucato@ospedaliriuniti.bergamo.it
PMID
2
TI
Updates on lupus and pregnancy.
AU
Buyon JP
SO
Bull NYU Hosp Jt Dis. 2009;67(3):271.
 
This review focuses on events subsequent to planning a pregnancy and addresses three components of concern for women with systemic lupus erythematosus: maternal, placental, and fetal. Flare rates are generally low for patients who are clinically stable at conception. For patients who have never had renal disease, there is no frm evidence that they will develop active renal disease simply due to being pregnant. For patients who begin pregnancy with an abnormal creatinine (>2 mg/dl is ill advised), risks include hypertension, preeclampsia, high rate of fetal loss, and possible further deterioration of renal function. Discontinuation of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and mycophenalate is mandatory. Elevated levels of sVEGF-1 may be a harbinger of preeclampsia. For patients with anti-phospholipid antibodies detected in the frst trimester of pregnancy, the lupus anticoagulant per se may be the strongest predictor of pregnancy complications. For women with anti-SSA/Ro antibodies the risk of having a child with congenital heart block is 2% which rises to a recurrence rate of 18%. Information on current approaches to prevention and treatment of heart complications of neonatal lupus is provided.
AD
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York 10019, USA. jill.buyon@nyumc.org
PMID