Myopericarditis

INTRODUCTION

The pericardium is a fibroelastic sac made up of visceral and parietal layers separated by a (potential) space, the pericardial cavity. In healthy individuals, the pericardial cavity contains 15 to 50 mL of an ultrafiltrate of plasma.

Diseases of the pericardium present clinically in one of four ways:

Acute and recurrent pericarditis

Pericardial effusion without major hemodynamic compromise

Cardiac tamponade

                         

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Literature review current through: Nov 2014. | This topic last updated: Feb 13, 2014.
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