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Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus: Treatment and prevention

Author
Kenneth McIntosh, MD
Section Editor
Martin S Hirsch, MD
Deputy Editor
Anna R Thorner, MD

INTRODUCTION

In September 2012, a case of novel coronavirus infection was reported involving a man in Saudi Arabia who was admitted to a hospital with pneumonia and acute kidney injury in June 2012 [1]. Only a few days later, a separate report appeared of an almost identical virus detected in a second patient with acute respiratory syndrome and acute kidney injury [2,3]. The second patient initially developed symptoms in Qatar but had traveled to Saudi Arabia before he became ill and then sought care in the United Kingdom [4]. Many subsequent cases and clusters of infections have been reported.

This novel coronavirus, initially termed human coronavirus-EMC (for Erasmus Medical Center), has been named Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) [5].

Updated information about MERS-CoV can be found on the World Health Organization's website and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's website.

The treatment and prevention of MERS-CoV are discussed here. The virology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of MERS-CoV are discussed separately. Community-acquired coronaviruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus are reviewed separately. (See "Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus: Virology, pathogenesis, and epidemiology" and "Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus: Clinical manifestations and diagnosis" and "Coronaviruses" and "Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)".)

TREATMENT

As with other coronaviruses, no antiviral agents are recommended for the treatment of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection. The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued recommendations for the management of severe respiratory infections suspected to be caused by MERS-CoV [6]. (See "Coronaviruses", section on 'Treatment and prevention'.)

          

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Literature review current through: Nov 2016. | This topic last updated: Tue Nov 29 00:00:00 GMT+00:00 2016.
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