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Mast cell disorders: An overview

Author
Cem Akin, MD, PhD
Section Editor
Bruce S Bochner, MD
Deputy Editor
Anna M Feldweg, MD

INTRODUCTION

Mast cell disorders are conditions in which mast cells are either increased in number, hyper-reactive, or both. These conditions range in severity from relatively benign disorders that do not impact life span to malignant clonal diseases that progress rapidly. This topic will review the classification of mast cell disorders, provide a brief clinical description of each disorder, and then discuss an approach to the patient suspected of having a mast cell disorder.

Specific mast cell disorders are discussed in greater detail separately:

(See "Mastocytosis (cutaneous and systemic): Epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations".)

(See "Mastocytosis (cutaneous and systemic): Evaluation and diagnosis in children".)

(See "Mastocytosis (cutaneous and systemic): Evaluation and diagnosis in adults".)

                          

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Literature review current through: Nov 2016. | This topic last updated: Tue Sep 27 00:00:00 GMT 2016.
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References
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