UpToDate
Official reprint from UpToDate®
www.uptodate.com ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.

Medline ® Abstract for Reference 33

of 'Laboratory tests to support the clinical diagnosis of anaphylaxis'

33
TI
Tryptase levels in children presenting with anaphylaxis: Temporal trends and associated factors.
AU
De Schryver S, Halbrich M, Clarke A, La Vieille S, Eisman H, Alizadehfar R, Joseph L, Morris J, Ben-Shoshan M
SO
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016;137(4):1138.
 
BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of anaphylaxis currently relies on suggestive clinical history after exposure to a potential triggering factor because no reliable diagnostic marker is available to confirm the diagnosis.
OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate tryptase levels in children with anaphylaxis and to examine predictors of elevated tryptase level (defined as≥11.4 μg/L during reaction and for those with a baseline level, defined as a reaction level of at least 2 ng/mL + 1.2 × [postreaction tryptase level]).
METHODS: Children presenting with anaphylaxis to the Montreal Children's Hospital were recruited over a 4-year period. Symptoms, triggers, and management of anaphylaxis were documented. Levels during the reaction and approximately 9 months after the reaction were compared on the basis of paired means using the t distribution. Multivariate linear and logistic regressions were used to evaluate the association between tryptase levels and risk factors.
RESULTS: Over a 4-year period, 203 children had serum tryptase levels measured. Among these, 39 children (19.2%; 95% CI, 14.1%-25.4%) had elevated levels. Only severe reactions were associated with reaction levels of 11.4 μg/L or more (odds ratio, 6.5; 95% CI, 2.2-19.0). Milk-induced anaphylaxis and severe reactions were more likely associated with increased tryptase levels (beta-adjusted, 4.0; 95% CI, 0.95-7.0, and 7.5; 95% CI, 4.8-10.3, respectively). Reaction levels exceeding the threshold level of 2 ng/mL + 1.2 × (postreaction tryptase level) detected most of the anaphylactic reactions, particularly if baseline levels were taken within 2 months of the reaction.
CONCLUSIONS: Tryptase levels are particularly useful for the diagnosis of severe and/or milk-induced anaphylaxis. Assessing the difference between reaction and postreaction tryptase levels may improve diagnostic sensitivity.
AD
Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Montreal Children's Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
PMID