UpToDate
Official reprint from UpToDate®
www.uptodate.com ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.

Medline ® Abstracts for References 11-13

of 'Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas (IPMN): Pathophysiology and clinical manifestations'

11
TI
Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas and tumor-like lesions with cystic features: a review of 418 cases and a classification proposal.
AU
Kosmahl M, Pauser U, Peters K, Sipos B, Lüttges J, Kremer B, Klöppel G
SO
Virchows Arch. 2004;445(2):168.
 
Although cystic neoplasms and lesions of the pancreas are rare, they have attracted a great deal of attention because of their potential curability. Since, in recent years, several new entities have been identified, the relative frequency of the tumors and their classification need to be reevaluated. In a series of 1454 tumorous lesions of the pancreas collected between 1971 and 2003 in our surgical pathology files and consultation files, all cystic pancreatic neoplasms and tumor-like lesions were identified and typed both histologically and immunohistochemically. There were 418 cases (29%) showing cysts with a diameter ranging between 0.5 cm and 27 cm. Most common were solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (21%) and intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms (18%). When only the cystic neoplasms and lesions that had been resected in a single institution were considered, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms were the most frequent cystic neoplasms, while solid pseudopapillary neoplasms took fifth place behind ductal adenocarcinomas with cystic features, serous cystic neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms. The most frequent cystic tumor-like lesions were pancreatitis-associated pseudocysts. New and rare entities that have recently been identified are mucinous nonneoplastic cysts, acinar cell cystadenomas and cystic hamartomas. Bearing in mind that figures from referral centers such as ours may be biased regarding the relative frequency of lesions, we concluded from our data that intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms are the most frequently occurring pancreatic cystic neoplasms, rather than solid pseudopapillary neoplasms. It was possible to classify all cystic lesions encountered in our files or described in the literature in a new system that distinguishes between neoplastic and nonneoplastic lesions, with further subdivisions into epithelial (adenomas, borderline neoplasms and carcinomas) and nonepithelial tumors. This classification is easy to handle and enables a distinction on the basis of clinical behavior and prognosis.
AD
Department of Pathology, University of Kiel, Germany. mkosmahl@path.uni-kiel.de
PMID
12
TI
A selective approach to the resection of cystic lesions of the pancreas: results from 539 consecutive patients.
AU
Allen PJ, D'Angelica M, Gonen M, Jaques DP, Coit DG, Jarnagin WR, DeMatteo R, Fong Y, Blumgart LH, Brennan MF
SO
Ann Surg. 2006;244(4):572.
 
OBJECTIVE: To define a group of patients with pancreatic cysts who do not require resection.
SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The increased use of cross-sectional imaging has resulted in an increased identification of small, asymptomatic pancreatic cysts. Data have not been available to determine which lesions should be resected.
METHODS: All patients evaluated at our institution between January 1995 and January 2005 for the ICD-9 diagnosis of pancreatic cyst were reviewed. Analysis was performed to identify associations between patient and cyst characteristics, and selection of operative or nonoperative management.
RESULTS: Pancreatic cysts were evaluated in 539 patients. Initial management was operative in 170 patients (32%), and nonoperative (radiographic follow-up) in 369 patients (68%). Factors associated with initial operative management included presence of a solid component (45% vs. 6%, P<0.001), larger size of the lesion (mean 4.8 cm vs. 2.4 cm,P = 0.001), and presence of symptoms (44% vs. 16%, P = 0.001). Malignancy was present in 18% (32 of 170) of patients initially resected. Mucinous tumors (n = 18) were the most common malignant histologic subtype. None of the invasive cancers arising from mucinous cysts was<3 cm. Median radiographic follow-up in patients initially managed nonoperatively was 24 months (range, 1-172 months). In 29 patients (8%), changes developed within the cyst that resulted in resection; malignancy was present in 11 of 39 (38%), representing 3% (11 of 369) of all patients being followed radiographically.
CONCLUSIONS: Selected patients with cystic lesions<3 cm in diameter and without a solid component may be followed radiographically with a malignancy risk (3% this study) that approximates the risk of mortality from resection. Malignancy within mucinous tumors is associated with size, and small mucinous tumors are very unlikely to be malignant.
AD
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, USA. allenp@mskcc.org
PMID
13
TI
Risk of malignancy in resected cystic tumors of the pancreas<or =3 cm in size: is it safe to observe asymptomatic patients? A multi-institutional report.
AU
Lee CJ, Scheiman J, Anderson MA, Hines OJ, Reber HA, Farrell J, Kochman ML, Foley PJ, Drebin J, Oh YS, Ginsberg G, Ahmad N, Merchant NB, Isbell J, Parikh AA, Stokes JB, Bauer T, Adams RB, Simeone DM
SO
J Gastrointest Surg. 2008;12(2):234.
 
Recent international consensus guidelines propose that cystic pancreatic tumors less than 3 cm in size in asymptomatic patients with no radiographic features concerning for malignancy are safe to observe; however, there is little published data to support this recommendation. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of malignancy in this group of patients using pancreatic resection databases from five high-volume pancreatic centers to assess the appropriateness of these guidelines. All pancreatic resections performed for cystic neoplasms<or =3 cm in size were evaluated over the time period of 1998-2006. One hundred sixty-six cases were identified, and the clinical, radiographic, and pathological data were reviewed. The correlation with age, gender, and symptoms (abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, jaundice, presence of pancreatitis, unexplained weight loss, and anorexia), radiographic features suggestive of malignancy by either computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or endoscopic ultrasound (presence of solid component, lymphadenopathy, or dilated main pancreatic duct or common bile duct), and the presence of malignancy was assessed using univariate and multivariate analysis. Amongthe 166 pancreatic resections for cystic pancreatic tumors<or =3 cm, 135 cases were benign [38 serous cystadenomas, 35 mucinous cystic neoplasms, 60 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN), 1 cystic papillary tumor, and 1 cystic islet cell tumor], whereas 31 cases were malignant (14 mucinous cystic adenocarcinomas and 13 invasive carcinomas and 4 in situ carcinomas arising in the setting of IPMN). A greater incidence of cystic neoplasms was seen in female patients (99/166, 60%). Gender was a predictor of malignant pathology, with male patients having a higher incidence of malignancy (19/67, 28%) compared to female patients (12/99, 12%; p<0.02). Older age was associated with malignancy (mean age 67 years in patients with malignant disease vs 62 years in patients with benign lesions (p<0.05). A majority of the patients with malignancy were symptomatic (28/31, 90%). Symptoms that correlated with malignancy included jaundice (p<0.001), weight loss (p<0.003), and anorexia (p<0.05). Radiographic features that correlated with malignancy were presence of a solid component (p<0.0001), main pancreatic duct dilation (p = 0.002), common bile duct dilation (p<0.001), and lymphadenopathy (p<0.002). Twenty-seven of 31(87%) patients with malignant lesions had at least one radiographic feature concerning for malignancy. Forty-five patients (27%) were identified as having asymptomatic cystic neoplasms. All but three (6.6%) of the patients in this group had benign disease. Of the patients that had no symptoms and no radiographic features, 1 out of 30 (3.3%) had malignancy (carcinoma in situ arising in a side branch IPMN). Malignancy in cystic neoplasms<or =3 cm in size was associated with older age, male gender, presence of symptoms (jaundice, weight loss, and anorexia), and presence of concerning radiographic features (solid component, main pancreatic duct dilation, common bile duct dilation, and lymphadenopathy). Among asymptomatic patients that displayed no discernable radiographic features suggestive of malignancy who underwent resection, the incidence of occult malignancy was 3.3%. This study suggests that a group of patients with small cystic pancreatic neoplasms who have low risk of malignancy can be identified, and selective resection of these lesions may be appropriate.
AD
University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
PMID