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Medline ® Abstracts for References 1,2

of 'Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas (IPMN): Evaluation and management'

1
TI
Histopathological diagnosis of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms: interobserver agreement.
AU
Longnecker DS, Adsay NV, Fernandez-del Castillo C, Hruban RH, Kasugai T, Klimstra DS, Klöppel G, Lüttges J, Memoli VA, Tosteson TD, Yanagisawa A, Wilentz R, Zamboni G
SO
Pancreas. 2005;31(4):344.
 
OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to evaluate the consistency of distinction between pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) and the hypothesis that guidelines for their distinction might be inadequate.
METHODS: A group of 93 pancreas specimens from surgical resections or autopsies that contained lesions consistent with histopathological diagnoses of PanIN-1A, PanIN-1B, PanIN-2, or IPMN (adenoma or borderline) was collected. The classification of these neoplasms by 6 pathologists, 2 from Europe, 2 from Japan, and 2 from the United States, was compared. The pathologists initially used guidelines current in their practice and then reviewed 47 of the 93 specimens a second time using new consensus definitions and guidelines for PanIN and IPMN that were developed in 2003.
RESULTS: The initial comparison showed frequent disagreement regarding both category and grade of the lesions. Agreement was greater for category than grade. In the second review, agreement among the 6 reviewers improved, remaining higher for category, although disagreements persisted for both category and grade.
CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the new definitions of PanIN and IPMN improve the consistency in classifying these lesions, but additional work is needed to further improve the reproducibility of their classification.
AD
Department of Pathology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA. daniel.s.longnecker@dartmouth.edu
PMID
2
TI
An illustrated consensus on the classification of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms.
AU
Hruban RH, Takaori K, Klimstra DS, Adsay NV, Albores-Saavedra J, Biankin AV, Biankin SA, Compton C, Fukushima N, Furukawa T, Goggins M, Kato Y, Klöppel G, Longnecker DS, Lüttges J, Maitra A, Offerhaus GJ, Shimizu M, Yonezawa S
SO
Am J Surg Pathol. 2004;28(8):977.
 
Invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an almost uniformly fatal disease. Several distinct noninvasive precursor lesions can give rise to invasive adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, and the prevention, detection, and treatment of these noninvasive lesions offers the potential to cure early pancreatic cancers. Noninvasive precursors of invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas include pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), and mucinous cystic neoplasms. Diagnostic criteria, including a distinct ovarian-type stroma, and a consistent nomenclature are well established for mucinous cystic neoplasms. By contrast, consistent nomenclatures and diagnostic criteria have been more difficult to establish for PanINs and IPMNs. Because both PanINs and IPMNs consist of intraductal neoplastic proliferations of columnar, mucin-containing cells with a variable degree of papilla formation, the distinction between these two classes of precursor lesions remains problematic. Thus, considerable ambiguities still exist in the classification of noninvasive neoplasms in the pancreatic ducts. A meeting of international experts on precursor lesions of pancreatic cancer was held at The Johns Hopkins Hospital from August 18 to 19, 2003. The purpose of this meeting was to define an international acceptable set of diagnostic criteria for PanINs and IPMNs and to address a number of ambiguities that exist in the previously reported classification systems for these neoplasms. We present a consensus classification of the precursor lesions in the pancreatic ducts, PanINs and IPMNs.
AD
Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, 401 N. Broadway, Weinberg 2242, Baltimore, MD 21231-2410, USA. rhruban@jhmi.edu
PMID