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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 72

of 'Infusion reactions to systemic chemotherapy'

72
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Use of cisplatin without desensitization after carboplatin hypersensitivity reaction in epithelial ovarian and primary peritoneal cancer.
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Callahan MB, Lachance JA, Stone RL, Kelsey J, Rice LW, Jazaeri AA
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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2007;197(2):199.e1.
 
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of substituting cisplatin for carboplatin in women who experienced a carboplatin-associated hypersensitivity reaction while undergoing treatment for gynecologic cancers.
STUDY DESIGN: Using a comprehensive data repository, we identified all epithelial ovarian cancer and primary peritoneal cancer patients who experienced a documented significant hypersensitivity reaction to carboplatin and were subsequently treated with cisplatin at our institution from 1995 to the present. We also performed a review of published case reports of similar patient management.
RESULTS: We identified a total of 24 patients who met inclusion criteria. Eighteen patients (75%) tolerated cisplatin without any adverse events. Six patients (25%) eventually developed a reaction to cisplatin; none was life threatening, and only 1 required hospitalization. Twenty-three of the 24 patients (96%) tolerated at least 1 cycle of cisplatin. Of the 5 patients who initially tolerated cisplatin but eventually experienced a reaction, the mean number of cycles tolerated was 3.4.
CONCLUSION: The use of cisplatin without desensitization is a reasonable approach for continuing platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with a significant carboplatin hypersensitivity reaction. Patients should be advised of risks and closely monitored, given published case reports of anaphylaxis.
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Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA.
PMID