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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 63

of 'Infiltrative thyroid disease'

63
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Thyroid: an unusual hideout for sarcoidosis.
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Manchanda A, Patel S, Jiang JJ, Babu AR
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Endocr Pract. 2013 Mar-Apr;19(2):e40-3.
 
OBJECTIVE: To present a case of dysphagia secondary to a progressively increasing nontoxic multinodular goiter caused by sarcoidosis.
METHODS: We summarize the clinical presentation and pertinent pathology in a patient with sarcoidosis involving the thyroid gland. A review of literature regarding this topic is also presented.
RESULTS: A 54-year-old man was noted to have asymptomatic nontoxic thyromegaly. Biopsy of right thyroid nodule was benign while the biopsy from the isthmus nodule was nondiagnostic. He presented with acute onset of dysphagia two months later and the work-up for gastrointestinal causes was negative. Chest imaging showed left-sided lymphadenopathy, and biopsy of a lymph node showed sarcoidosis. Two years after the initial presentation a repeat biopsy of the isthmus nodule was again reported as nondiagnostic. Because he had persistent dysphagia, he underwent total thyroidectomy with resolution of dysphagia. Histopathological examination of the thyroid revealed non necrotizing granulomas consistent with sarcoidosis.
CONCLUSION: This case brings to light this uncommon etiology of a nontoxic multinodular goiter. Involvement of the thyroid gland by sarcoidosis is very rare. It has been reported in 4.2 to 4.6% of patients with sarcoidosis. In patients with pulmonary or extrapulmonary sarcoidosis and associated thyromegaly, possible involvement of the thyroid by this process should be considered.
AD
Department of Internal Medicine, John H. Stroger Jr., Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.
PMID