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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 8

of 'Induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia in younger adults'

8
TI
Anthracyclines during induction therapy in acute myeloid leukaemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
AU
Teuffel O, Leibundgut K, Lehrnbecher T, Alonzo TA, Beyene J, Sung L
SO
Br J Haematol. 2013 Apr;161(2):192-203. Epub 2013 Feb 8.
 
This systematic review and meta-analysis compared the efficacy of different anthracyclines and anthracycline dosing schedules for induction therapy in acute myeloid leukaemia in children and adults younger than 60 years of age. Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were eligible for inclusion in the review. Idarubicin (IDA), in comparison to daunorubicin (DNR), reduced remission failure rates (risk ratio (RR) 0·81; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0·66-0·99; P = 0·04), but did not alter rates of early death or overall mortality. Superiority of IDA for remission induction was limited to studies with a DNR/IDA dose ratio<5 (ratio<5: RR 0·65; 95% CI, 0·51-0·81; P < 0·001; ratio≥5: RR 1·03; 95% CI, 0·91-1·16; P = 0·63). Higher-dose DNR, compared to lower-dose DNR, was associated with reduced rates for remission failure (RR 0·75; 95% CI, 0·60-0·94; P = 0·003) and overall mortality (RR 0·83; 95% CI, 0·75-0·93; P < 0·001), but not for early death. Comparisons of several other anthracycline derivates did not reveal significant differences in outcomes. Survival estimates in adults suggest that both high-dose DNR (90 mg/m(2) daily × 3 or 50 mg/m(2) daily × 5) and IDA (12 mg/m(2) daily × 3) can achieve 5-year survival rates of between 40 and 50 percent.
AD
Division of Haematology/Oncology, University Children's Hospital Berne, Berne, Switzerland.
PMID