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Medline ® Abstracts for References 2,15,16

of 'Iliotibial band syndrome'

2
TI
Iliotibial tract friction syndrome in athletes--an uncommon exertion syndrome on the lateral side of the knee.
AU
Orava S
SO
Br J Sports Med. 1978;12(2):69.
 
An uncommon exertion pain on the lateral side of the knee is described in 88 patients, in four of whom it was bilateral. The disorder is a result of the friction of the iliotibial tract over the lateral femoral epicondyle. The syndrome is the iliotibial tract friction syndrome of ITFS. All the patients in the material were active athletes or middle-aged joggers in regular training. The cases were seen over four years and four months. The mean age of them was approximately 25 years, and there were only nine women in the series. Th pain appeared usually after running and was localised on the outer femoral condyle, and often radiated downwards along the iliotibial tract. Conservative treatment and changes in training habits cured most cases. The disorder has not often been described in the literature, and seems to appear only in physically very active people, such as athletes or military recruits.
AD
PMID
15
TI
Etiology of iliotibial band friction syndrome in distance runners.
AU
Messier SP, Edwards DG, Martin DF, Lowery RB, Cannon DW, James MK, Curl WW, Read HM Jr, Hunter DM
SO
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1995;27(7):951.
 
The objectives of our study were: 1) to examine differences between a noninjured cohort of runners (N = 70) and runners afflicted with iliotibial band friction syndrome (ITBFS) (N = 56) according to selected anthropometric, biomechanical, muscular strength, and training measures; 2) to explore multivariate relationships among these measures in both the well and injured groups; and 3) to develop specific hypotheses concerning risk factors for injury that will later be tested in a prospective observational study. High speed videography (200 fps), a force platform (500 Hz), and a Cybex II+ isokinetic dynamometer were used to assess rearfoot motion, ground reaction forces, and knee muscular strength and endurance, respectively. A linear discriminant function analysis of the training data revealed weekly mileage, training pace, number of months using current training protocol, % time spent swimming, and % time spent running on a track to be significant (P<0.10). Height was a significant anthropometric discriminator, while seven isokinetic strength and endurance measures were found to discriminate significantly between the groups. Calcaneal to vertical touchdown angle, and maximum supination velocity were significant rearfoot movement discriminators. Maximum braking force was the only significant kinetic discriminator. A combined discriminant analysis using those variables found to be significant in the previous analyses revealed weekly mileage, and maximum normalized braking force to be the best discriminators (model P<0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
AD
J. B. Snow Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Health and Sport Science, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109, USA.
PMID
16
TI
Iliotibial band syndrome: evaluation and management.
AU
Strauss EJ, Kim S, Calcei JG, Park D
SO
J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2011;19(12):728.
 
Iliotibial band syndrome is a common overuse injury typically seen in runners, cyclists, and military recruits. Affected patients report lateral knee pain associated with repetitive motion activities. The diagnosis is usually made based on a characteristic history and physical examination, with imaging studies reserved for cases of recalcitrant disease to rule out other pathologic entities. Several etiologies have been proposed for iliotibial band syndrome, including friction of the iliotibial band against the lateral femoral epicondyle, compression of the fat and connective tissue deep to the iliotibial band, and chronic inflammation of the iliotibial band bursa. The mainstay of treatment is nonsurgical; however, in persistent or chronic cases, surgical management is indicated.
AD
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, USA.
PMID