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Medline ® Abstracts for References 1-3,7,8

of 'Iliotibial band syndrome'

1
TI
Tendoperiostitis in the lateral femoral condyle in long-distance runners.
AU
Staff PH, Nilsson S
SO
Br J Sports Med. 1980;14(1):38.
 
AD
PMID
2
TI
Iliotibial tract friction syndrome in athletes--an uncommon exertion syndrome on the lateral side of the knee.
AU
Orava S
SO
Br J Sports Med. 1978;12(2):69.
 
An uncommon exertion pain on the lateral side of the knee is described in 88 patients, in four of whom it was bilateral. The disorder is a result of the friction of the iliotibial tract over the lateral femoral epicondyle. The syndrome is the iliotibial tract friction syndrome of ITFS. All the patients in the material were active athletes or middle-aged joggers in regular training. The cases were seen over four years and four months. The mean age of them was approximately 25 years, and there were only nine women in the series. Th pain appeared usually after running and was localised on the outer femoral condyle, and often radiated downwards along the iliotibial tract. Conservative treatment and changes in training habits cured most cases. The disorder has not often been described in the literature, and seems to appear only in physically very active people, such as athletes or military recruits.
AD
PMID
3
TI
Biomechanics of iliotibial band friction syndrome in runners.
AU
Orchard JW, Fricker PA, Abud AT, Mason BR
SO
Am J Sports Med. 1996;24(3):375.
 
We propose a biomechanical model to explain the pathogenesis of iliotibial band friction syndrome in distance runners. The model is based on a kinematic study of nine runners with iliotibial band friction syndrome, a cadaveric study of 11 normal knees, and a literature review. Friction (or impingement) occurs near footstrike, predominantly in the foot contact phase, between the posterior edge of the iliotibial band and the underlying lateral femoral epicondyle. The study subjects had an average knee flexion angle of 21.4 degrees +/- 4.3 degrees at footstrike, with friction occurring at, or slightly below, the 30 degrees of flexion traditionally described in the literature. In the cadavers we examined, there was substantial variation in the width of the iliotibial bands. This variation may affect individual predisposition to iliotibial band friction syndrome. Downhill running predisposes the runner to iliotibial band friction syndrome because the knee flexion angle at footstrike is reduced. Sprinting and faster running on level ground are less likely to cause or aggravate iliotibial band friction syndrome because, at footstrike, the knee is flexed beyond the angles at which friction occurs.
AD
Sports Science and Sports Medicine Centre, Australian Institute of Sport, Canberra, Australia.
PMID
7
TI
Iliotibial band friction syndrome in runners.
AU
Noble CA
SO
Am J Sports Med. 1980;8(4):232.
 
The iliotibial band friction syndrome is an overuse injury found in long-distance runners. It is characterized by pain on the outer aspect of the knee in close relation to the lateral femoral epicondyle. It is usually poorly localized, is aggravated by running long distances or excessive striding, and is more severe running downhill. It may be prevented by walking with a stiff knee. In a series of 100 consecutive knees, including 6 patients with the syndrome in both knees (age range, 19 to 48 years; average, 31 years), of which 73 were available for follow-up evaluation, only 30 patients were resolved on the initial regimen of a single injection of local steroid and reduction in the training program. Twenty-one patients had two injections and 8 patients required the third injection. The remaining 14 patients were placed on a regimen of total rest from running for 4 to 6 weeks. Nine patients returned to training and had no recurrence of pain. Five patients consented to surgery and returned to long-distance running between 2 and 7 weeks later. The syndrome apparently has a higher incidence in areas where long-distance running is the vogue, such as, South Africa, or where the climate is cool and running surfaces are slippery.
AD
PMID
8
TI
The iliotibial band friction syndrome.
AU
Renne JW
SO
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1975;57(8):1110.
 
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PMID