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Medline ® Abstracts for References 1-3

of 'Hereditary pancreatitis'

1
TI
A gene for hereditary pancreatitis maps to chromosome 7q35.
AU
Whitcomb DC, Preston RA, Aston CE, Sossenheimer MJ, Barua PS, Zhang Y, Wong-Chong A, White GJ, Wood PG, Gates LK Jr, Ulrich C, Martin SP, Post JC, Ehrlich GD
SO
Gastroenterology. 1996;110(6):1975.
 
BACKGROUND& AIMS: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is an autosomal-dominant disorder with incomplete penetrance characterized by recurrent bouts of severe epigastric pain with onset usually at 5-10 years of age. A genetic linkage study was designed to identify the HP gene.
METHODS: A 500-member pedigree was constructed from a U.S. kindred centered in eastern Kentucky and western Virginia. A genome-wide search strategy was employed using a 36-member subset of this family to determine the genetic locus for HP. Testing for linkage to microsatellite loci was performed at 20-cM intervals.
RESULTS: Linkage was established between the HP phenotype and chromosome 7q in this subset of the family. Modeled as an autosomal dominant disorder with 80% penetrance, a maximal multipoint logarithm of the odds score of 4.3 was obtained using a four-point analysis consisting of markers D7S684, D7S661, D7S505, and the HP locus. Two microsatellite markers, D7S661 and D7S505, that correspond to the 7q35 region of chromosome 7 spanning a 6-cM region did not evidence obligaterecombinations with HP. The centromeric and telomeric limits are defined by recombinations at D7S684 and D7S483, respectively, which generates a 19-cM locus for HP. Utilizing family members from the extended pedigree, a break in the high-risk haplotype between D7S684 and D7S661 was observed, which suggests it may be possible to exclude an additional 8 cM from the HP locus. A maximal pairwise logarithm of the odds score of 4.73 at a recombination fraction of theta at D7S684 was obtained with the addition of these extended family members.
CONCLUSIONS: Linkage of HP to 7q35 represents a major advancement in our understanding of the genetic basis of this disorder.
AD
Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA. Whitcomb+@pitt.edu
PMID
2
TI
Hereditary pancreatitis is caused by a mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene.
AU
Whitcomb DC, Gorry MC, Preston RA, Furey W, Sossenheimer MJ, Ulrich CD, Martin SP, Gates LK Jr, Amann ST, Toskes PP, Liddle R, McGrath K, Uomo G, Post JC, Ehrlich GD
SO
Nat Genet. 1996;14(2):141.
 
Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, early-onset genetic disorder characterized by epigastric pain and often more serious complications. We now report that an Arg-His substitution at residue 117 of the cationic trypsinogen gene is associated with the HP phenotype. This mutation was observed in all HP affected individuals and obligate carriers from five kindreds, but not in individuals who married into the families nor in 140 unrelated individuals. X-ray crystal structure analysis, molecular modelling, and protein digest data indicate that the Arg 117 residue is a trypsin-sensitive site. Cleavage at this site is probably part of a fail-safe mechanism by which trypsin, which is activated within the pancreas, may be inactivated; loss of this cleavage site would permit autodigestion resulting in pancreatitis.
AD
Dept of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pennsylvania 15261, USA.
PMID
3
TI
Mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene are associated with recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis.
AU
Gorry MC, Gabbaizedeh D, Furey W, Gates LK Jr, Preston RA, Aston CE, Zhang Y, Ulrich C, Ehrlich GD, Whitcomb DC
SO
Gastroenterology. 1997;113(4):1063.
 
BACKGROUND&AIMS: We recently identified a single R117H mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene in several kindreds with an inherited form of acute and chronic pancreatitis (HP1), providing strong evidence that trypsin plays a central role in premature zymogen activation and pancreatitis. However, not all families studied have this mutation. The aim of this study was to determine the disease-causing mutation in kindreds with hereditary pancreatitis that lack the previously identified mutation.
METHODS: Clinical features of the HP1 kindreds were compared with those of the new kindreds (HP2), and genetic linkage analysis, screening for mutations through DNA sequencing, and screening an unaffected population were performed.
RESULTS: The onset of symptoms was delayed and hospitalizations were fewer in HP2 compared with HP1 (P<0.05). Linkage of the disease gene to chromosome 7q35 was established (logarithm of the odds, 3.73). Mutational screening identified a single A to T mutation resulting in an asparagine to isoleucine transition mutation at position 21 (N21I) in cationictrypsinogen. The mutation was absent in 94 unrelated individuals, representing 188 unique chromosomes.
CONCLUSIONS: The identification of a second mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene (HP2) suggests a dominant role of trypsin in premature protease activation-mediated forms of acute pancreatitis. The pathogenesis of hereditary pancreatitis also suggests that chronic pancreatitis may result from recurrent acute pancreatitis.
AD
Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
PMID