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Medline ® Abstracts for References 1-4

of 'Granulomatous gastritis'

1
TI
A clinicopathologic study of 42 patients with granulomatous gastritis. Is there really an "idiopathic" granulomatous gastritis?
AU
Shapiro JL, Goldblum JR, Petras RE
SO
Am J Surg Pathol. 1996;20(4):462.
 
Idiopathic granulomatous gastritis (IGG) is a diagnosis made only by excluding other causes of granulomatous gastritis, such as infection, foreign bodies, and systemic granulomatous diseases. Recently, several investigators have questioned the existence of IGG. We reviewed the slides and clinical data of all cases of granulomatous gastritis seen at the Cleveland Clinic between 1975 and 1994. In addition to routine hematoxylin and eosin stains, slides from all cases were stained with Ziehl-Neelsen, Gomori's methenamine silver, and Giemsa stains. Clinical information and follow-up were available for 42 patients. The clinicopathologic diagnoses of the 42 patients with granulomatous gastritis were as follows: Crohn's disease (n = 23), three of whom had concomitant chronic active gastritis with Helicobacter pylori infection; sarcoidosis (n = 9), four of whom had concomitant chronic active gastritis with H. pylori infection; chronic active gastritis with H. pylori infection and no other systemic illness (n = 2); distal esophageal adenocarcinoma and chronic active gastritis (n = 2); mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma with chronic active gastritis and presumed H. pylori infection (n = 2); peptic ulcer complications (n = 2); hypertrophic gastropathy with chronic active gastritis (n = 1); and possible Crohn's disease (n = 1). We conclude that (a) in most cases of granulomatous gastritis,a diagnosis of Crohn's disease or sarcoidosis could be established; (b) the background inflammatory pattern was helpful in suggesting a diagnostic category for granulomatous gastritis; (c) granulomatous gastritis is not associated with H. pylori per se; however, if known cases of Crohn's disease and sarcoidosis are excluded, an association between H. pylori and granulomatous gastritis cannot be ruled out; and (d) IGG, if it exists, is extremely rare.
AD
Department of Anatomic Pathology, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH 44195, USA.
PMID
2
TI
Granulomatous gastritis: a morphological and diagnostic approach.
AU
Ectors NL, Dixon MF, Geboes KJ, Rutgeerts PJ, Desmet VJ, Vantrappen GR
SO
Histopathology. 1993;23(1):55.
 
The final diagnosis of granulomatous gastritis is based on morphological findings and clinical and laboratory data. Detailed analysis of the morphological features of the granulomas together with associated mucosal changes could generate more information on aetiology and pathogenesis. Biopsies from 71 patients diagnosed as having granulomatous gastritis were reviewed. Thirty-seven of these patients (52%) had Crohn's disease. In 18 patients (25%) an isolated granulomatous gastritis was diagnosed. In seven patients (10%) the final diagnosis was a foreign body reaction. Of the remaining cases, four (7%) corresponded to tumour-associated granulomas and one case each of sarcoidosis (1%), Whipple's disease (1%) and vasculitis-associated disease (1%). Two cases (3%) were unclassifiable. The granulomas were mainly found in the antrum (64% antrum only, 11% antrum and corpus, 6% transitional mucosa corpus-antrum). Granulomas were usually small. This was particularly true for those found in patients with Crohn's disease. Multiple granulomas were observed in the sarcoidosis, the Whipple's disease and vasculitis-associated cases. A pattern of chronic gastritis with atrophy was present in 95% of the biopsies (68/71 patients). Helicobacter pylori was detected in 92% of the biopsies (64/71 patients).
AD
Department of Pathology II, U.Z. St Rafaël, Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium.
PMID
3
TI
Granulomatous gastritis: a clinicopathologic analysis of 18 biopsy cases.
AU
Maeng L, Lee A, Choi K, Kang CS, Kim KM
SO
Am J Surg Pathol. 2004;28(7):941.
 
Granulomas in gastric biopsy specimens are extremely rare, and in Western countries, more than half are associated with Crohn's disease. To evaluate the incidence and their etiology in a gastric carcinoma (and Helicobater pylori infection)-prevalent area, gastric mucosal biopsies were reviewed and their clinicopathologic findings were analyzed. The clinicopathologic diagnoses of the 18 patients with granulomatous gastritis were as follows: chronic gastritis with (n = 14) and without (n = 1) H. pylori infection; gastric adenocarcinomas (n = 2); and Crohn's disease (n = 1). Almost all cases of granulomatous gastritis in this study showed small erosions or ulcers on the endoscopic examinations. H. pylori were found to be one of the most common causes of granulomatous gastritis after excluding all other causes for the granulomas in this study. The granulomas were more frequently found in the antrum, superficially located, and were related to damage within a pit in which the H. pylori were commonly observed. These findings suggest that H. pylori can be causal in the pathogenesis of granulomatous gastritis.
AD
Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Bupyung-gu, Inchon, Korea.
PMID
4
TI
ISOLATED GRANULOMATOUS GASTRITIS: ITS RELATIONSHIP TO DISSEMINATED SARCOIDOSIS AND REGIONAL ENTERITIS.
AU
FAHIMI HD, DEREN JJ, GOTTLIEB LS, ZAMCHECK N
SO
Gastroenterology. 1963;45:161.
 
AD
PMID