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Medline ® Abstracts for References 98,99,105

of 'Fluoropyrimidine-associated cardiotoxicity: Incidence, clinical manifestations, mechanisms, and management'

98
TI
Capecitabine can induce acute coronary syndrome similar to 5-fluorouracil.
AU
Frickhofen N, Beck FJ, Jung B, Fuhr HG, Andrasch H, Sigmund M
SO
Ann Oncol. 2002;13(5):797.
 
Capecitabine is a member of a new class of oral fluoropyrimidines. It is a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) prodrug, activated by a series of enzymes. Activation has been demonstrated to occur preferentially in tumor tissue, which may explain the favorable balance of efficacy and toxicity of this drug. Cardiotoxicity, a rare but potentially serious adverse effect of 5-FU, has not been reported for capecitabine to date. Here we report a patient who experienced a severe and prolonged acute coronary syndrome during treatment with capecitabine. He had previously developed similar symptoms during treatment with infusional 5-FU. Capecitabine should thus be considered an agent with cardiotoxic potential. This adverse effect should be specifically monitored in all patients treated with capecitabine. Patients with symptoms suggestive of cardiotoxicity during previous treatment with a fluoropyrimidine should not be treated with capecitabine.
AD
Department of Hematology/Oncology, HSK, Dr-Horst-Schmidt-Kliniken GmbH, Wiesbaden, Germany. n.frickhofen@t-online.de
PMID
99
TI
Common etiology of capecitabine and fluorouracil-induced coronary vasospasm in a colon cancer patient.
AU
Aksoy S, Karaca B, Dinçer M, Yalçin S
SO
Ann Pharmacother. 2005;39(3):573. Epub 2005 Feb 8.
 
AD
PMID
105
TI
Bolus 5-fluorouracil as an alternative in patients with cardiotoxicity associated with infusion 5-fluorouracil and capecitabine: a case series.
AU
Saif MW, Garcon MC, Rodriguez G, Rodriguez T
SO
In Vivo. 2013 Jul;27(4):531-4.
 
BACKGROUND: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the backbone of chemotherapy regimens approved for treatment of colorectal cancer. The incidence of cardiotoxicity associated with 5-FU ranges from 1.5% to 18%; 48% as anginal symptoms and 2% as cardiogenic shock. Cardiotoxicity is unpredictable and no alternative chemotherapeutics have been defined so far.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: We present a case series of six patients who developed cardiotoxicity on infusional fluorouracil and/or capecitabine and were challenged with bolus 5-FU for the treatment of their malignancies. Four patients were tested for polymorphic abnormality of the human dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene (DPYD) with the TheraGuide 5-FU™(Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT, USA) pharmacogenetic test.
RESULTS: Five patients were challenged with oral capecitabine that reproduced clinical and/or diagnostic concerns. All six patients tolerated bolus 5-FU either as a radiosensitizing agent or as chemotherapy without recurrence of a cardiac insult. DPYD was normal in thefour patients tested.
CONCLUSION: Cardiotoxicity induced by 5-FU seems to be schedule-dependent. Bolus 5-FU can be used in patients developing cardiotoxicity due to 5-FU infusion or capecitabine with vigilance.
AD
Section of GI Cancers and Experimental Therapeutics, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111, USA. wsaif@tuftsmedicalcenter.org
PMID