UpToDate
Official reprint from UpToDate®
www.uptodate.com ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.

Medline ® Abstracts for References 138-141

of 'Fluoropyrimidine-associated cardiotoxicity: Incidence, clinical manifestations, mechanisms, and management'

138
TI
Management of a patient with metastatic colorectal cancer and liver metastases.
AU
Saif MW
SO
Case Rep Oncol Med. 2014;2014:790192. Epub 2014 Mar 12.
 
Liver metastases are commonly encountered in patients presenting with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC); resection is the treatment of choice. A number of systemic treatment options are currently available for such patients, including the use of 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapies and oxaliplatin (e.g., FOLFOX) in combination with biologic agents that target angiogenesis (e.g., bevacizumab). For patients with progression following first-line treatment, current second-line options include a change in chemotherapy with bevacizumab (for patients who did or did not receive prior bevacizumab) or FOLFIRI in combination with aflibercept, a more recently approved antiangiogenesis therapy. Neurotoxicity is a well-established adverse event of oxaliplatin-based therapy. The current case details an mCRC patient with liver metastases who was treated with a capecitabine and oxaliplatin regimen (XELOX), and experienced two episodes of transient cortical blindness possibly related to oxaliplatin. After disease progression, the patient was switched to a regimen of FOLFIRI and aflibercept and did well on this second-line regimen.
AD
Tufts University School of Medicine, 800 Washington Street, Suite 7S-7099, Boston, MA 02111, USA.
PMID
139
TI
Secondary hepatic resection as a therapeutic goal in advanced colorectal cancer.
AU
Saif MW
SO
World J Gastroenterol. 2009;15(31):3855.
 
Surgery is the only curative option for patients with liver metastases of colorectal cancer, but few patients present with resectable hepatic lesions. Chemotherapy is increasingly used to downstage initially unresectable disease and allow for potentially curative surgery. Standard chemotherapy regimens convert 10%-20% of cases to resectable disease in unselected populations and 30%-40% of those with disease confined to the liver. One strategy to further increase the number of candidates eligible for surgery is the addition of active targeted agents such as cetuximab and bevacizumab to standard chemotherapy. Data from a phase III trial indicate that cetuximab increases the number of patients eligible for secondary hepatic resection, as well as the rate of complete resection when combined with first-line treatment with the FOLFIRI regimen. The safety profiles of preoperative cetuximab or bevacizumab have not been thoroughly assessed, but preliminary evidence indicates that these agents do not increase surgical mortality or exacerbate chemotherapy-related hepatotoxicity, such as steatosis (5-fluorouracil), steatohepatitis (irinotecan), and sinusoidal obstruction (oxaliplatin). Secondary resection is a valid treatment goal for certain patients with initially unresectable liver metastases and an important end point for future clinical trials.
AD
Yale Cancer Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06519, United States. wasif.saif@yale.edu
PMID
140
TI
Safety and efficacy of radiofrequency ablation with aflibercept and FOLFIRI in a patient with metastatic colorectal cancer.
AU
Agarwal A, Daly KP, Butler-Bowen H, Saif MW
SO
Anticancer Res. 2014 Nov;34(11):6775-8.
 
BACKGROUND: A vast majority of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) are not candidates for surgical resection. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a safe and effective technique for treatment of isolated liver metastasis. After radiofrequency ablation, residual tumor can have aggressive growth, part of which is driven by the up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Angiogenesis inhibitor bevacuzimab has been used in the management of mCRC with RFA. We present a patient with recurrent colorectal cancer and four hepatic metastases who was treated with RFA combined with aflibercept, another VEGF inhibitor and systemic chemotherapy. We believe that this is the first report of using aflibercept with RFA.
CASE REPORT: A 35-year-old female with stage IV rectal cancer with metastasis to a lymph node and multiple hepatic metastases was treated with chemo-radiation, surgical resection of the tumor and surgical resection of two segments of the liver. She underwent RFA of the hepatic lesions that could not be resected. She received adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin for a total of 6 months. However, a positron emission tomography (PET) scan showed progression of disease with new and growing lymph nodes. She was treated with 6 cycles ofcapecitabine monotherapy. A follow-up PET scan showed four new liver lesions. She has RFA of her four liver lesions and was started on a combination of aflibercept and FOLFIRI. She received 10 cycles and a repeat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and PET scan showed stable disease.
DISCUSSION: This is the first reported case of a patient managed with RFA with aflibercept, an anti-VEGF agent, and FOLFIRI. This case showed both efficacy, as well as safety for the combined modalities in the management of mCRC.
AD
Steward Carney Hospital, Boston, MA, U.S.A.
PMID
141
TI
Safety and efficacy of combined Yttrium-90 resin radioembolization with aflibercept and FOLFIRI in a patient with metastatic colorectal cancer
AU
De Souza A, Daly K, Yoo J, Saif MW
SO
Cas Rep Onc Med. 2015;
 
AD