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Febrile infant (younger than 90 days of age): Outpatient evaluation

Authors
Hannah F Smitherman, MD
Charles G Macias, MD, MPH
Section Editors
Stephen J Teach, MD, MPH
Sheldon L Kaplan, MD
Deputy Editor
James F Wiley, II, MD, MPH

INTRODUCTION

The outpatient evaluation of febrile infants younger than 90 days of age is discussed in this topic.

For a discussion of the management of febrile infants younger than 90 days of age; definition of fever in the young infant; the diagnosis, evaluation, and initial management of early-onset sepsis in neonates; and the approach to the ill-appearing infant without fever, refer to the following topics:

(See "Febrile infant (younger than 90 days of age): Management".)

(See "Febrile infant (younger than 90 days of age): Definition of fever".)

(See "Clinical features, evaluation, and diagnosis of sepsis in term and late preterm infants", section on 'Evaluation and initial management'.)

                                    

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Literature review current through: Nov 2016. | This topic last updated: Wed Nov 09 00:00:00 GMT+00:00 2016.
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