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Medline ® Abstracts for References 90,91

of 'Evaluation of suspected obstructive sleep apnea in children'

90
TI
Pediatric OSAS: Oximetry can provide answers when polysomnography is not available.
AU
Kaditis A, Kheirandish-Gozal L, Gozal D
SO
Sleep Med Rev. 2016;27:96. Epub 2015 Jun 4.
 
Overnight polysomnography is the gold standard tool for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in habitually snoring children, but it is expensive and not always available. Nocturnal oximetry has been proposed as an abbreviated and low-cost testing modality for the diagnosis of OSAS. In this systematic review, 25 original articles were evaluated to: (i) summarize reference values of nocturnal oximetry parameters in healthy children; (ii) identify abnormal oximetry patterns that predict OSAS in habitually snoring children; (iii) delineate abnormalities in oximetry that can predict responses to treatment interventions for OSAS and potential complications. Nocturnal SpO2 drops<90%, more than two clusters of desaturation events (≥4%) and oxyhemoglobin desaturation (≥4%) index (ODI4)>2.2 episodes/h are unusual in children without OSAS. At least three clusters of desaturation events, and at least three SpO2 drops below 90% in a nocturnal oximetry recording are indicative of moderate-to-severe OSAS. An ODI4>2 episodes/h combined with OSAS symptoms also exhibits high positive predictive value for apnea-hypopnea index>1 episode/h. Children without clusters of desaturation events have low risk of major respiratory complications following adenotonsillectomy. Thus, nocturnal oximetry emerges as a valuable tool that can facilitate treatment decisions when polysomnography is not available.
AD
Pediatric Pulmonology Unit, Sleep Disorders Laboratory, First Department of Pediatrics, University of Athens School of Medicine and Aghia Sophia Children's Hospital, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: kaditia@hotmail.com.
PMID
91
TI
Development of a screening tool for sleep disordered breathing in children using the phone Oximeter™.
AU
Garde A, Dehkordi P, Karlen W, Wensley D, Ansermino JM, Dumont GA
SO
PLoS One. 2014;9(11):e112959. Epub 2014 Nov 17.
 
BACKGROUND: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) can lead to daytime sleepiness, growth failure and developmental delay in children. Polysomnography (PSG), the gold standard to diagnose SDB, is a highly resource-intensive test, confined to the sleep laboratory.
AIM: To combine the blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) characterization and cardiac modulation, quantified by pulse rate variability (PRV), to identify children with SDB using the Phone Oximeter, a device integrating a pulse oximeter with a smartphone.
METHODS: Following ethics approval and informed consent, 160 children referred to British Columbia Children's Hospital for overnight PSG were recruited. A second pulse oximeter sensor applied to the finger adjacent to the one used for standard PSG was attached to the Phone Oximeter to record overnight pulse oximetry (SpO2 and photoplethysmogram (PPG)) alongside the PSG.
RESULTS: We studied146 children through the analysis of the SpO2 pattern, and PRV as an estimate of heart rate variability calculated from the PPG. SpO2 variability and SpO2 spectral power at low frequency, was significantly higher in children with SDB due to the modulation provoked by airway obstruction during sleep (p-value<0.01). PRV analysis reflected a significant augmentation of sympathetic activity provoked by intermittent hypoxia in SDB children. A linear classifier was trained with the most discriminating features to identify children with SDB. The classifier was validated with internal and external cross-validation, providing a high negative predictive value (92.6%) and a good balance between sensitivity (88.4%) and specificity (83.6%). Combining SpO2 and PRV analysis improved the classification performance, providing an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 88%, beyond the 82% achieved using SpO2 analysis alone.
CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that the implementation of this algorithm in the Phone Oximeter will provide an improved portable, at-home screening tool, with the capability of monitoring patients over multiple nights.
AD
Electrical and Computer Engineering in Medicine Group, The University of British Columbia and BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
PMID