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Medline ® Abstracts for References 8,25-28

of 'Evaluation of suspected obstructive sleep apnea in children'

8
TI
Diagnosis and management of childhood obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.
AU
Marcus CL, Brooks LJ, Draper KA, Gozal D, Halbower AC, Jones J, Schechter MS, Ward SD, Sheldon SH, Shiffman RN, Lehmann C, Spruyt K, American Academy of Pediatrics
SO
Pediatrics. 2012;130(3):e714.
 
OBJECTIVE: This technical report describes the procedures involved in developing recommendations on the management of childhood obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS).
METHODS: The literature from 1999 through 2011 was evaluated.
RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A total of 3166 titles were reviewed, of which 350 provided relevant data. Most articles were level II through IV. The prevalence of OSAS ranged from 0% to 5.7%, with obesity being an independent risk factor. OSAS was associated with cardiovascular, growth, and neurobehavioral abnormalities and possibly inflammation. Most diagnostic screening tests had low sensitivity and specificity. Treatment of OSAS resulted in improvements in behavior and attention and likely improvement in cognitive abilities. Primary treatment is adenotonsillectomy (AT). Data were insufficient to recommend specific surgical techniques; however, children undergoing partial tonsillectomy should be monitored for possible recurrence of OSAS. Although OSAS improved postoperatively, the proportion of patients who had residual OSAS ranged from 13% to 29% in low-risk populations to 73% when obese children were included and stricter polysomnographic criteria were used. Nevertheless, OSAS may improve after AT even in obese children, thus supporting surgery as a reasonable initial treatment. A significant number of obese patients required intubation or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) postoperatively, which reinforces the need for inpatient observation. CPAP was effective in the treatment of OSAS, but adherence is a major barrier. For this reason, CPAP is not recommended as first-line therapy for OSAS when AT is an option. Intranasal steroids may ameliorate mild OSAS, but follow-up is needed. Data were insufficient to recommend rapid maxillary expansion.
AD
PMID
25
TI
Snoring, sleep disturbance, and behaviour in 4-5 year olds.
AU
Ali NJ, Pitson DJ, Stradling JR
SO
Arch Dis Child. 1993;68(3):360.
 
Parents of 996 children aged 4-5 years identified consecutively from the Oxford health visitor register were asked to complete a questionnaire about breathing disorders during sleep. A total of 782 (78.5%) was returned. Ninety five (12.1%) children were reported to snore on most nights. Habitual snoring was significantly associated with daytime sleepiness, restless sleep, and hyperactivity. The questionnaire responses were used to select two subgroups, one at high risk of a sleep and breathing disorder and a control group. These children (132 in total) were monitored at home with overnight video recording and oximetry, and had formal behavioural assessment using the Conners scale. Seven (7/66) children from the high risk group and none from the control group had obvious sleep disturbance consequent on snoring and upper airway obstruction. Thus our estimate of the prevalence of sleep and breathing disorders in this age group is 7/996 or 0.7%. The high risk group had significantly higher nocturnal movement, oxygen saturation dip rates, and overnight pulse rates than the controls. Maternal but not paternal smoking was associated with the high risk group. Parents and teachers thought those in the high risk group were more hyperactive and inattentive than the controls, but only their parents thought them more aggressive. Significant sleep and breathing disorders occur in about 0.7% of 4-5 year olds. Children whose parents report snoring and sleep disturbance have objective evidence of sleep disruption and show more behaviour problems than controls.
AD
Osler Chest Unit, Churchill Hospital, Headington, Oxford.
PMID
26
TI
Snoring, apneic episodes, and nocturnal hypoxemia among children 6 months to 6 years old. An epidemiologic study of lower limit of prevalence.
AU
Gislason T, Benediktsdóttir B
SO
Chest. 1995;107(4):963.
 
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To identify a lower limit of the prevalence of sleep-related breathing disturbances among preschool children.
DESIGN: A cross-sectional epidemiologic study in two stages, first by questionnaires and second by whole-night investigation of children symptomatic of the sleep apnea syndrome.
SETTING: Gardabaer, a small town, 10 km south of Reykjavìk, Iceland.
PARTICIPANTS: All children in Gardabaer, 6 months to 6 years old (n = 555).
MEASUREMENTS: Symptom score estimated by questionnaire and respiratory events based on overnight oximetry, thermistors, and a static charge sensitive bed.
RESULTS: The response rate was 81.8%. Snoring was reported as often or very often among 14 (3.2%) and occasionally by 73 (16.7%). Apneic episodes were reported often or very often among seven (1.6%). Altogether 18 children were highly suspected of the sleep apnea syndrome because of habitual snoring or apneic episodes. The girls (n = 9) were older than the boys (mean age: 46 +/- 21 months vs 20 +/- 12 months, p<0.001). Eventually 11 children came for a whole-night investigation and 8 of them showed more than three respiratory events per hour of sleep, associated with>or = 4% oxygen desaturation. The lower limit of the sleep apnea syndrome prevalence among these children was thus 2.9% (SE, 0.5%).
CONCLUSIONS: Among children, symptoms such as snoring and apneic episodes are reported relatively seldom, but a high proportion of the children with these symptoms have hypoxic respiratory events.
AD
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Iceland.
PMID
27
TI
Risk factors for sleep-disordered breathing in children. Associations with obesity, race, and respiratory problems.
AU
Redline S, Tishler PV, Schluchter M, Aylor J, Clark K, Graham G
SO
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1999;159(5 Pt 1):1527.
 
This study examined risk factors for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children and adolescents; specifically, quantifying risk associated with obesity, race, and upper and lower respiratory problems. Subjects were participants in a genetic-epidemiologic study of SDB and included 399 children and adolescents 2 to 18 yr of age, recruited as members of families with a member (a proband) with known sleep apnea (31 index families) or as members of neighborhood control families (30 families). SDB was assessed with home overnight multichannel monitoring and SDB was defined based on an apneahypopnea index>/= 10 (moderately affected) or<5 (unaffected). SDB of moderate level was significantly associated with obesity (odds ratio, 4.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.58 to 13.33) and African-American race (odds ratio, 3.49; 95% CI, 1.56 to 8.32) but not with sex or age. After adjusting for obesity, proband sampling, race and familial clustering, sinus problems and persistent wheeze each independently (of the other) predicted SDB. These data suggest the importance of upper and lower respiratory problems and obesity as risk factors for SDB in children and adolescents. Increased risk in African Americans appears to be independent of the effects of obesity or respiratory problems.
AD
Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University, Rainbow Babies and Childrens Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
PMID
28
TI
Prevalence and risk factors of habitual snoring in primary school children.
AU
Li AM, Au CT, So HK, Lau J, Ng PC, Wing YK
SO
Chest. 2010;138(3):519.
 
OBJECTIVE: Our study aimed to determine the prevalence of habitual snoring (HS) in primary school children and to evaluate the diurnal symptoms and conditions that may be associated with it.
METHODS: A validated questionnaire completed by parents was used to assess the sleep and daytime behaviors of Chinese children aged 5 to 14 years. Thirteen primary schools in two representative districts were randomly selected.
RESULTS: A total of 6,349 out of 9,172 questionnaires (response rate 69.2%) with complete answers were returned. The prevalence rate of HS was 7.2%. Male sex (odds ratio [OR][95% CI]: 2.5 [1.7-3.6]), BMI z score (OR [95% CI]: 1.4 [1.1-1.6]), maternal HS (OR [95% CI]: 3.4 [2.0-5.7]), paternal HS (OR [95% CI]: 3.8 [2.7-5.5]), allergic rhinitis (OR [95% CI]: 2.9 [2.0-4.2]), asthma (OR [95% CI]: 2.4 [1.2-5.2]), nasosinusitis (OR [95% CI]: 4.0 [1.5-10.6]), and tonsillitis (OR [95% CI]: 3.1 [1.9-5.1]) in the past 12 months were identified to be independent risk factors associated with HS. HS was also associated with daytime, nocturnal, parasomniac, and sleep-related breathing symptoms. HS was demonstrated to be an independent risk factor for parent-reported poor temper (OR [95% CI]: 1.9 [1.4-2.5]), hyperactivity (OR [95%CI]: 1.7 [1.2-2.5]), and poor school performance (OR [95% CI]: 1.7 [1.2-2.5]).
CONCLUSIONS: HS was a significant and prevalent problem in primary school children. Male sex, obesity, parental HS, atopic symptoms, and history of upper respiratory infections were significant risk factors. HS was also associated with sleep-disordered breathing symptoms and adverse neurobehavioral outcomes.
AD
Department of Pediatrics, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong. albertmli@cuhk.edu.hk
PMID