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Medline ® Abstracts for References 49,71

of 'Evaluation of suspected obstructive sleep apnea in children'

49
TI
Evaluation of pulmonary function and polysomnography in obese children and adolescents.
AU
Marcus CL, Curtis S, Koerner CB, Joffe A, Serwint JR, Loughlin GM
SO
Pediatr Pulmonol. 1996;21(3):176.
 
Obese adults have an increased prevalence of pulmonary disorders. Although childhood obesity is a common problem, few studies have evaluated the pulmonary complications of obesity in the pediatric population. We, therefore, performed pulmonary function tests (PFTs), polysomnography, and multiple sleep latency tests (MSLTs) in 22 obese children and adolescents [mean age, 10 +/- 5 (SD) years; 73 percent female; 184 +/- 36 percent ideal body weight], none of whom presented because of sleep or respiratory complaints. PFTs were normal in all but two subjects. Ten (46 percent) subjects had abnormal polysomnograms. There was a positive correlation between the degree of obesity and the apnea index (r = 0.47, P<0.05), and an inverse correlation between the degree of obesity and the Sa0(2) nadir (r = -0.60, P<0.01). The degree of sleepiness on MSLT correlated with the degree of obesity (r = -0.50, P<0.05). We conclude that obese children and adolescents have a high prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing, although in many cases it is mild. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) improved following tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. We recommend that pediatricians have a high index of suspicion for OSAS when evaluating obese patients, and that polysomnography be considered for these patients.
AD
Eudowood Division of Pediatric Respiratory Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
PMID
71
TI
Polysomnography in obese children with a history of sleep-associated breathing disorders.
AU
Silvestri JM, Weese-Mayer DE, Bass MT, Kenny AS, Hauptman SA, Pearsall SM
SO
Pediatr Pulmonol. 1993;16(2):124.
 
We hypothesized that obese children with a history of breathing difficulty during sleep would demonstrate (1) evidence of complete and partial obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with hypercarbia and/or hypoxemia; and (2) correlation between symptoms, degree of obesity, adenoid and tonsil size, and polysomnography (PSG) results. We evaluated 32 obese children [% ideal body weight (IBW), 196 +/- 45%]with a sleep history questionnaire, airway radiographs, electrocardiograms (ECG), and PSG. By history, we found snoring (100%), difficulty breathing (59%), sweating (44%), restlessness (53%), arousals (41%), apnea (50%), worsening with upper respiratory infection (URI) (81%), hypersomnolence (59%), and mouth breathing (59%). We found adenoid and/or tonsil enlargement on 75% of airway x-ray pictures. ECGs were abnormal in 5 patients. Among all patients, mean sleep study oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2) was 85 +/- 16% and mean end-tidal CO2 (PetCO2) was 51 +/- 7 torr; 84% had paradoxical inward movement of the chest on inspiration, 59% had OSA, and 66% had partial OSA. In those with>or = 200% IBW and adenotonsillar enlargement, elevated PetCO2 and the presence of hypoxemia (SaO2<90%) for>or = 5% of the total sleep time (TST) were correlated, unlike in patients of similar weight but without adenotonsillar enlargement. Individuals symptoms did not correlate with the severity of PSG abnormalities. By discriminant analysis, using three variables (IBW, presence of adenotonsillar tissue, and presence of>or = 5 symptoms), we could predict PSG abnormalities with up to 81% reliability. Our findings indicate that in obese children, particularly those with %IBW>or = 200 and adenotonsillar hypertrophy, with sleep-disordered breathing evaluation by polysomnography should be considered.
AD
Rush Medical College of Rush University, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, Illinois 60612.
PMID