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Medline ® Abstracts for References 3,7

of 'Evaluation of suspected obstructive sleep apnea in children'

3
TI
Obstructive sleep apnea in infants and children.
AU
Brouillette RT, Fernbach SK, Hunt CE
SO
J Pediatr. 1982;100(1):31.
 
Twenty-two infants and children were found to have clinically significant obstructive sleep apnea. A history suggesting complete or partial airway obstruction during sleep was obtained on all patients, and physical examination of the sleeping patient revealed snoring, retractions, or OSA in 21 patients. Nevertheless, the mean delay in referral for 20 patients first seen after the neonatal period was 23 +15 (+ SD) months. Sixteen of 22 patients (73%) developed serious sequelae: cor pulmonale in 12 (55%), failure to thrive in six (27%), permanent neurologic damage in two (9%), and behavioral disturbances, hypersomnolence, or developmental delays in five (23%). Clinical and radiologic evaluations revealed anatomic abnormalities which narrowed the upper airway in 21 patients; enlarged tonsils and/or adenoids in 14, micrognathia in three,generalized facial abnormalities in three, and cleft palate repair/tonsillar hypertrophy in one. In five patients, upper airway fluoroscopy was performed and was helpful in establishing the site and mechanism of obstruction. Polygraphic monitoring was utilized to quantify the frequency and duration of OSA. Prolonged partial airway obstruction during sleep resulted in significant hypercarbia in 11 patients and hypoxemia in five. Twenty patients improved after surgery which relieved or bypassed the pharyngeal airway obstruction; two cases are pending. Increased awareness of OSA and examination of the sleeping patient should result in earlier treatment and less morbidity for infants and children with OSA.
AD
PMID
7
TI
Prolonged morbidity due to delays in the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in children.
AU
Richards W, Ferdman RM
SO
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2000;39(2):103.
 
The inclusion of a query concerning the presence of snoring in a questionnaires used by the Allergy Service of Childrens Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) uncovered a significant number of patients who were experiencing prolonged and discomforting symptoms owing to previously undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) caused by adenotonsillar hypertrophy. Of 352 patients who were discharged with a diagnosis of OSA and tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy at CHLA in 1996-1997, a retrospective study of the first 45 randomly selected patients who agreed to participate in a telephone interview was performed. Analysis revealed that all patients experienced severe and discomforting symptoms with all describing severe or moderate snoring. Other symptoms included chronic mouth breathing (84%), frequent otitis media (64%), sinusitis (56%), sore throat (51%), choking (47%), and daytime drowsiness (42%). Other symptoms included poor school performance, enuresis, poor appetite and/or weight gain, dysphagia, and vomiting. Symptoms began at a mean age of approximately 2 years ("birth"-9 years), and the mean period of time between the development of significant symptoms and OSA was 3.3 years (6 months-13 years). Delay between onset of significant symptoms and surgery was>1 year in 82% of the patients,>2 years in 51% of the patients,>4 years in 31% of the patients, and>6 years in 13% of the patients. Forty percent of patients were self-referred to an otolaryngologist for treatment despite their primary care physician being aware of the symptoms. These results indicate that patient with OSA experienced prolonged morbidity and delays in treatment, which is probably widespread. Physician, parent, and third-party factors were found to have contributed to the delays in treatment.
AD
Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Pediatrics, University of Southern California, USA.
PMID