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Medline ® Abstracts for References 3,5,23,24

of 'Evaluation of suspected obstructive sleep apnea in children'

3
TI
Obstructive sleep apnea in infants and children.
AU
Brouillette RT, Fernbach SK, Hunt CE
SO
J Pediatr. 1982;100(1):31.
 
Twenty-two infants and children were found to have clinically significant obstructive sleep apnea. A history suggesting complete or partial airway obstruction during sleep was obtained on all patients, and physical examination of the sleeping patient revealed snoring, retractions, or OSA in 21 patients. Nevertheless, the mean delay in referral for 20 patients first seen after the neonatal period was 23 +15 (+ SD) months. Sixteen of 22 patients (73%) developed serious sequelae: cor pulmonale in 12 (55%), failure to thrive in six (27%), permanent neurologic damage in two (9%), and behavioral disturbances, hypersomnolence, or developmental delays in five (23%). Clinical and radiologic evaluations revealed anatomic abnormalities which narrowed the upper airway in 21 patients; enlarged tonsils and/or adenoids in 14, micrognathia in three,generalized facial abnormalities in three, and cleft palate repair/tonsillar hypertrophy in one. In five patients, upper airway fluoroscopy was performed and was helpful in establishing the site and mechanism of obstruction. Polygraphic monitoring was utilized to quantify the frequency and duration of OSA. Prolonged partial airway obstruction during sleep resulted in significant hypercarbia in 11 patients and hypoxemia in five. Twenty patients improved after surgery which relieved or bypassed the pharyngeal airway obstruction; two cases are pending. Increased awareness of OSA and examination of the sleeping patient should result in earlier treatment and less morbidity for infants and children with OSA.
AD
PMID
5
TI
Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.
AU
Guilleminault C, Lee JH, Chan A
SO
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005;159(8):775.
 
OBJECTIVE: To review evidence-based knowledge of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS).
DATA SOURCES AND EXTRACTION: We reviewed published articles regarding pediatric OSAS; extracted the clinical symptoms, syndromes, polysomnographic findings and variables, and treatment options, and reviewed the authors' recommendations.
DATA SYNTHESIS: Orthodontic and craniofacial abnormalities related to pediatric OSAS are commonly ignored, despite their impact on public health. One area of controversy involves the use of a respiratory disturbance index to define various abnormalities, but apneas and hypopneas are not the only abnormalities obtained on polysomnograms, which can be diagnostic for sleep-disordered breathing. Adenotonsillectomy is often considered the treatment of choice for pediatric OSAS. However, many clinicians may not discern which patient population is most appropriate for this type of intervention; the isolated finding of small tonsils is not sufficient to rule out the need for surgery. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure can be an effective treatment option, but it entails cooperation and training of the child and the family. A valid but often overlooked alternative, orthodontic treatment, may complement adenotonsillectomy.
CONCLUSIONS: Many complaints and syndromes are associated with pediatric OSAS. This diagnosis should be considered in patients who report the presence of such symptoms and syndromes.
AD
Stanford University Sleep Disorders Program, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. cguil@stanford.edu
PMID
23
TI
Inability of clinical history to distinguish primary snoring from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children.
AU
Carroll JL, McColley SA, Marcus CL, Curtis S, Loughlin GM
SO
Chest. 1995;108(3):610.
 
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine whether primary snoring (PS) could be distinguished from childhood obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) by clinical history.
DESIGN: Retrospective study of clinical history of 83 children with snoring and/or sleep disordered breathing who were referred for polysomnography.
SETTING: Tertiary referral center; pediatric pulmonary sleep apnea clinic.
MEASUREMENTS: We evaluated the ability of a clinical obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) score and other questions about sleep, breathing, and daytime symptoms to distinguish PS from OSAS in children. Parents were asked about the child's snoring, difficulty breathing, observed apnea, cyanosis, struggling to breathe, shaking the child to "make him or her breathe," watching the child sleep, afraid of apnea, the frequency and loudness of snoring, and daytime symptoms such as excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS).
RESULTS: Based on polysomnography results, 48 patients were classified as PS and 35 as OSAS. Peak endtidal CO2 (49 +/- 3.2 vs 55 +/- 8.2 [SD]mm Hg); lowest arterial oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry (95 +/- 1.9 vs 82 +/- 14%); and apnea/hypopnea index (0.27 +/- .3 vs 8.4 +/- 6 events/h) indicated that the diagnostic criteria for PS versus OSA were reasonable. There were no differences between PS and OSA patients with respect to age, sex, race, failure to thrive, obesity, history of EDS, snoring history, history of cyanosis during sleep, or daytime symptoms except for mouth breathing. There were no significant differences in sleep variables between PS patients and those with any severity of OSAS. The OSA score misclassified about one of four patients. Comparing PS and OSA patients, significant findings were daytime mouth breathing (61 vs 85%; p = 0.024); observed apnea (46 vs 74%; p = 0.013); shaking the child (31 vs. 60%; p = 0.01); struggling to breathe (58 vs 89%; p = 0.003); and afraid of apnea (71 vs 91%; p = 0.028). However, none of these were sufficiently discriminatory to predict OSAS.
CONCLUSION: We conclude that PS in children cannot be reliably distinguished from OSAS by clinical history alone.
AD
Eudowood Division of Pediatric Respiratory Sciences, Johns Hopkins Children's Center, Baltimore, MD 21287-2533, USA.
PMID
24
TI
A review of 50 children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.
AU
Guilleminault C, Korobkin R, Winkle R
SO
Lung. 1981;159(5):275.
 
AD
PMID