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Medline ® Abstracts for References 29,30

of 'Evaluation of suspected obstructive sleep apnea in children'

29
TI
Increased behavioral morbidity in school-aged children with sleep-disordered breathing.
AU
Rosen CL, Storfer-Isser A, Taylor HG, Kirchner HL, Emancipator JL, Redline S
SO
Pediatrics. 2004;114(6):1640.
 
OBJECTIVE: To assess whether sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), ranging from primary snoring to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), is associated with increased behavioral morbidity.
METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted of school-aged children in an urban, community-based cohort, stratified for term or preterm (<37 weeks' gestation) birth status. A total of 829 children, 8 to 11 years old (50% female, 46% black, 46% former preterm birth) were recruited from a cohort study. All children had unattended in-home overnight cardiorespiratory recordings of airflow, respiratory effort, oximetry, and heart rate for measurement of the apnea hypopnea index (number of obstructive apneas and hypopneas per hour). SDB was defined by either parent-reported habitual snoring or objectively measured OSA. Functional outcomes were assessed with 2 well-validated parent ratings of behavior problems: the Child Behavioral Checklist and the Conners Parent Rating Scale-Revised:Long.
RESULTS: Forty (5%) children were classified as having OSA (median apnea hypopnea index: 7.1 per hour; interquartile range: 3.1-10.5), 122 (15%) had primary snoring without OSA, and the remaining 667 (80%) had neither snoring nor OSA. Children with SDB had significantly higher odds of elevated problem scores in the following domains: externalizing, hyperactive, emotional lability, oppositional, aggressive, internalizing, somatic complaints, and social problems.
CONCLUSIONS: Children with relatively mild SDB, ranging from primary snoring to OSA, have a higher prevalence of problem behaviors, with the strongest, most consistent associations for externalizing, hyperactive-type behaviors.
AD
Department of Pediatrics, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 11100 Euclid Ave, RB&C 790 Mail Stop 6003, Cleveland, OH 44106-6003, USA. carol.rosen@case.edu
PMID
30
TI
Sleep architecture and respiratory disturbances in children with obstructive sleep apnea.
AU
Goh DY, Galster P, Marcus CL
SO
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2000;162(2 Pt 1):682.
 
Little is known regarding sleep architecture in children with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We hypothesized that sleep architecture was normal, and that apnea increased over the course of the night, in children with OSAS. We analyzed polysomnographic studies from 20 children with OSAS and 10 control subjects. Sleep architecture was similar between the groups. Of obstructive apneas 55% occurred during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The apnea index, apnea duration, and degree of desaturation were greater during REM than non-REM sleep. OSAS data from the first and third periods of the night (periods A and C) were compared. Both the overall and the REM apnea index increased between periods A and C (11 to 25/h, p<0.02; and 24 to 51/h, p<0.01, respectively). There was no difference in Sa(O(2)) over time. Spontaneous arousals, but not respiratory-related arousals, were more frequent during non-REM than REM sleep; these did not change from periods A to C. We conclude that children with OSAS have normal sleep stage distribution. OSAS is predominantly a REM phenomenon in children. Obstructive apnea worsens over the course of the night, independent of the changing amounts of REM sleep. We speculate that this increase in apnea severity may be secondary to upper airway muscle fatigue, changes in upper airway neuromotor control, or changes in REM density.
AD
Department of Pediatrics, National University of Singapore, Singapore.
PMID