Ethical issues in palliative care

INTRODUCTION

Ethical issues in palliative care often arise because of concerns about how much and what kind of care make sense for someone with a limited life expectancy. There is often conflict between clinicians, nurses, other healthcare team members, patients, and family members about what constitutes appropriate care, particularly as patients approach death.

This topic will discuss ethical issues in palliative care. Other issues regarding the legal aspects of end of life care and advance care planning are discussed separately. In addition, issues related to specific symptoms for the patient in palliative care and/or at the end of life are discussed separately.

(See "Advance care planning and advance directives".)

(See "Legal aspects in palliative and end of life care".)

(See "Approach to symptom assessment in palliative care".)

                        

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Literature review current through: Sep 2014. | This topic last updated: Jun 25, 2014.
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References
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