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Epidemiology and risk factors for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

Authors
Jean Lee Lim, MD
Maryam Asgari, MD, MPH
Section Editors
Robert S Stern, MD
June K Robinson, MD
Deputy Editor
Rosamaria Corona, MD, DSc

INTRODUCTION

Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a common cancer arising from malignant proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. The likelihood of developing SCC is dependent upon exposure to risk factors (most importantly ultraviolet light) and patient-specific characteristics, such as age, skin type, and ethnicity.

The epidemiology and risk factors of cutaneous SCC will be reviewed here. The clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of cutaneous SCC are discussed elsewhere. Skin cancer in solid organ transplant recipients is discussed separately.  

(See "Clinical features and diagnosis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)".)

(See "Evaluation for locoregional and distant metastases in cutaneous squamous cell and basal cell carcinoma".)

(See "Treatment and prognosis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma".)

                                           

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Literature review current through: Nov 2016. | This topic last updated: Mon Jan 04 00:00:00 GMT+00:00 2016.
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