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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 13

of 'Epidemiology and pathogenesis of portal vein thrombosis in adults'

13
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Factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and deficiencies in coagulation inhibitors associated with Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis: results of a case-control study.
AU
Janssen HL, Meinardi JR, Vleggaar FP, van Uum SH, Haagsma EB, van Der Meer FJ, van Hattum J, Chamuleau RA, Adang RP, Vandenbroucke JP, van Hoek B, Rosendaal FR
SO
Blood. 2000;96(7):2364.
 
In a collaborative multicenter case-control study, we investigated the effect of factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and inherited deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrombin on the risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). We compared 43 BCS patients and 92 PVT patients with 474 population-based controls. The relative risk of BCS was 11.3 (95% CI 4.8-26.5) for individuals with factor V Leiden mutation, 2.1(95% CI 0.4-9.6) for those with prothrombin gene mutation, and 6.8 (95% CI 1.9-24.4) for those with protein C deficiency. The relative risk of PVT was 2.7 (95% CI 1.1-6.9) for individuals with factor V Leiden mutation, 1.4 (95% CI 0.4-5.2) for those with prothrombin gene mutation, and 4.6 (95% CI 1.5-14.1) for those with protein C deficiency. The relative risk of BCS or PVT was not increased in the presence of inherited protein S or antithrombin deficiency. Concurrence of either acquired or inherited thrombotic risk factors was observed in 26% of the BCS patients and 37% of the PVT patients. We conclude that factor V Leiden mutation and hereditary protein C deficiency appear to be important risk factors for BCS and PVT. Although the prevalence of the prothrombin gene mutation was increased, it was not found to be a significant risk factor for BCS and PVT. The coexistence of thrombogenic risk factors in many patients indicates that BCS and PVT can be the result of a combined effect of different pathogenetic mechanisms.
AD
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Leiden University Medical Center; Department of Hepatogastroenterology, Erasmus University Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
PMID