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Medline ® Abstracts for References 11-13

of 'Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus and ganglia interventions'

11
TI
Neurolytic celiac plexus block for pain control in unresectable pancreatic cancer.
AU
Yan BM, Myers RP
SO
Am J Gastroenterol. 2007;102(2):430.
 
BACKGROUND: A major focus of palliation in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer is pain control. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the efficacy and safety of neurolytic celiac plexus blockade (NCPB) compared with standard treatment in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.
METHODS: An electronic search was completed (1966 through August, 2005) for RCTs comparing NCPB versus control (standard treatment and/or sham NCPB) in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. The primary outcome was pain measured on a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes included opioid usage, adverse effects, quality of life (QOL), and survival. All outcomes were assessed at 2, 4, and 8 wk.
RESULTS: Five RCTs involving 302 patients (NCPB, N = 147; control, N = 155) met the inclusion criteria. Mean age was 61.0 +/- 4.3 yr. Compared with control, NCPB was associated with lower VAS scores for pain at 2, 4, and 8 wk (weighted mean difference [WMD]-0.60, 95% CI -0.82 to -0.37). Opioid usage (in mg/d oral morphine) was also reduced at 2, 4, and 8 wk (WMD -85.9, 95% CI -144.0 to -27.9). NCPB was associated with a reduction in constipation (relative risk 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.91), but not other adverse events. No differences in survival were observed. QOL could not be adequately analyzed due to differences in outcome scales among studies.
CONCLUSIONS: In patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, NCPB is associated with improved pain control, and reduced narcotic usage and constipation compared with standard treatment, albeit with minimal clinical significance.
AD
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
PMID
12
TI
CT-guided percutaneous neurolytic celiac plexus block technique.
AU
Wang PJ, Shang MY, Qian Z, Shao CW, Wang JH, Zhao XH
SO
Abdom Imaging. 2006;31(6):710.
 
Up to now, the studies in the world have demonstrated that CT-guided percutaneous neurolytic celiac plexus block (PNCPB) is an invaluable therapeutic modality in the treatment of refractory abdominal pain caused by cancer. Its efficacy of pain relief varied in reported studies. The main technical considerations which would affect the analgesic effects on abdominal pain included the patients' cooperation, needle entry approaches, combined use of blocking approaches, localization of the target area, dosage of the blocker, and so on. A success of PNCPB depends greatly on close cooperation with patients. The patient should be educated about the purpose and steps of the procedure, and trained of breathing in and breathing hold. The needle entry can be divided into the posterior approach and the anterior approach. The former one is the most commonly used in clinical practice, but the latter one is rarely used except in the cases that the posterior approach becomes technically difficult. Bilateral multiple blocking of celiac plexus and splanchnic nerves is often required to achieve optimal analgesia. The needle entry site, insertion course, and depth should be preselected and simulated on CT monitor prior to the procedure in order to ensure an accurate and safe celiac plexus block. The magnitude of analgesic effect is closely related to the degree of degeneration and necrosis of the celiac plexus. Maximally filling with blocker in the retropancreatic space is an indication of sufficient blocking. We also provided an overview of indications and contraindications, preoperative preparations, complications and its treatment of PNCPB.
AD
Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital Affiliated to Tongji University, Shanghai 200065, China. Tongjipjwang@vip.sina.com
PMID
13
TI
Celiac plexus block for visceral pain.
AU
Carroll I
SO
Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2006;10(1):20.
 
Celiac plexus block has long been used to provide analgesia for upper abdominal pain. In particular, neurolytic celiac plexus block has been advocated for pancreatic cancer pain. In this article, recent advances clarifying the role and limitations of neurolytic celiac plexus block are reviewed. Neurolytic celiac plexus block provides persistent augmented analgesia when used as an adjunct to systemic opiates, but does not reliably decrease opiate requirements. In addition, neurolytic celiac plexus block may prolong survival, but the data supporting this remain controversial. The optimal technique for accomplishing neurolytic celiac plexus block remains undetermined.
AD
Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94034-1573, USA. irc38@pain.stanford.edu
PMID