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Medline ® Abstracts for References 11-13

of 'Effect of antidepressants on suicide risk in children and adolescents'

11
TI
Emergence of depressive symptoms during treatment for panic disorder with specific 5-hydroxytryptophan reuptake inhibitors.
AU
Fux M, Taub M, Zohar J
SO
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1993;88(4):235.
 
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) have been established as effective drugs in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders. However, there are also reports that they can induce depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts in patients. Eighty of 230 patients who met the DSM-III-R criteria for panic disorder received, during the course of treatment, fluvoxamine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) at a dose level between 50-200 mg/day. The patients were clinically evaluated for a history of affective disorder and for the presence of affective symptoms before the treatment and for emergence of depressive symptoms during the treatment. Seven of the 80 patients (9%) developed symptoms of depression despite a good antianxiety response. Five of the 7 patients received fluvoxamine as second choice after tricyclic antidepressants (TCA). These patients had no history of affective disorder, and no symptoms of depression were present before the treatment with fluvoxamine. The depressive symptoms abated after the fluvoxamine was discontinued and TCA or clonazepam was prescribed. The depressive symptoms reappeared when fluoxetine was administered. None of these 7 patients developed depressive symptoms while treated with TCA or clonazepam. Among the 150 patients treated with TCA and benzodiazepines, not a single case of depression was seen in patients without a previous history of depression. These results suggest avulnerability among some of panic disorder patients to noradrenergic-serotonergic imbalance caused by SSRI, which has to be taken into clinical consideration.
AD
Beersheva Mental Health Center, Ben Gurion University, Israel.
PMID
12
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Antidepressant drug therapy and suicide in severely depressed children and adults: A case-control study.
AU
Olfson M, Marcus SC, Shaffer D
SO
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006;63(8):865.
 
CONTEXT: The Food and Drug Administration has issued a boxed warning concerning increased suicidal ideation and behavior associated with antidepressant drug treatment in children and adolescents. It is unknown whether antidepressant agents increase the risk of suicide death in children or adults.
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the relative risk of suicide attempt and suicide death in severely depressed children and adults treated with antidepressant drugs vs those not treated with antidepressant drugs.
DESIGN: Matched case-control study.
SETTING: Outpatient treatment settings in the United States.
PARTICIPANTS: Medicaid beneficiaries from all 50 states who received inpatient treatment for depression, excluding patients treated for pregnancy, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or other psychoses, mental retardation, dementia, or delirium. Controls were matched to cases for age, sex, race or ethnicity, state of residence, substance use disorder, recent suicide attempt, number of days since hospital discharge, and recent treatment with antipsychotic, anxiolytic/hypnotic, mood stabilizer, and stimulant medications.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Suicide attempts and suicide deaths.
RESULTS: In adults (aged 19-64 years), antidepressant drug treatment was not significantly associated with suicide attempts (odds ratio [OR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86-1.39 [521 cases and 2394 controls]) or suicide deaths (OR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.52-1.55 [86 cases and 396 controls]). However, in children and adolescents (aged 6-18 years), antidepressant drug treatment was significantly associated with suicide attempts (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.12-2.07 [263 cases and 1241 controls]) and suicide deaths (OR, 15.62; 95% CI, 1.65-infinity [8 cases and 39 controls]).
CONCLUSIONS: In these high-risk patients, antidepressant drug treatment does not seem to be related to suicide attempts and death in adults but might be related in children and adolescents. These findings support careful clinical monitoring during antidepressant drug treatment of severely depressed young people.
AD
New York State Psychiatric Institute/Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. mo49@columbia.edu
PMID
13
TI
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk of suicide: a systematic review of observational studies.
AU
Barbui C, Esposito E, Cipriani A
SO
CMAJ. 2009;180(3):291.
 
BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and other antidepressant drugs reduce the risk of suicide in people with depression. We explored the association between exposure to SSRIs and risk of suicide completion or attempt.
METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of observational studies that reported completed or attempted suicide in depressed individuals who were exposed to SSRIs compared with those who were not exposed to antidepressants. We assessed the overall risk of completed or attempted suicide.
RESULTS: Eight studies involving more than 200 000 patients with moderate or severe depression were included in the meta-analysis. Although exposure to SSRIs increased the risk of completed or attempted suicide among adolescents (odds ratio [OR]1.92, 95% confidence interval [CI]1.51-2.44), the risk was decreased among adults (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.47-0.70). Among people aged 65 or more years, exposure to SSRIs had a protective effect (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.27-0.79). Sensitivityanalyses did not change these findings. In particular, for studies that used completed suicide as an outcome, exposure to SSRIs was associated with increased risk among adolescents (OR 5.81, 95% CI 1.57-21.51) and decreased risk among adults (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.52-0.83) and older people (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.26-1.06).
INTERPRETATION: Based on data from observational studies, use of SSRIs may be associated with a reduced risk of suicide in adults with depression. Among adolescents, use of SSRIs may increase suicidality.
AD
World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Mental Health, Department of Medicine and Public Health, Section of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy.
PMID