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Medline ® Abstracts for References 14-17

of 'Discussing goals of care'

14
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Teaching and learning end-of-life care: evaluation of a faculty development program in palliative care.
AU
Sullivan AM, Lakoma MD, Billings JA, Peters AS, Block SD, PCEP Core Faculty
SO
Acad Med. 2005 Jul;80(7):657-68.
 
PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Program in Palliative Care Education and Practice (PCEP), an intensive faculty development program at Harvard Medical School.
METHOD: PCEP is a two-week program offered annually with two on-site sessions in Boston, MA, and an interim period distance-learning component. Training integrates palliative care clinical skill development, learning theory and teaching methods, and leadership and organizational change. Longitudinal surveys (preprogram, retrospective preprogram, and postprogram) of participants from 2000-03 assessed self-reported preparation in providing and teaching palliative care; teaching and patient care practices; and satisfaction with program.
RESULTS: The response rate was 96% (n=149) for Session I and 72% for both Session I and II (n=113). Questionnaire responses demonstrated statistically significant improvements with large effect sizes (range 0.7-1.8) on nearly all measures. Preparation increased from 3.0+/-1.1 to 4.2+/-0.7 for providing end-of-life care (1=not well prepared, 5=very well prepared), and from 2.6+/-1.0 to 4.3+/-0.7 for teaching this topic. Respondents reported behavioral changes in patient care and teaching; e.g., after the program, 63% noted that, specifically as a result of attending the course, they encouraged learners to reflect on their emotional responses to dying patients, and 57% conducted experiential exercises (e.g., role-play). Eighty-two percent rated the experience as "transformative," and many responses to open-ended items described powerful learning experiences. Participants rated the program highly (4.9+/-0.1, 1=lowest, 5=highest rating).
CONCLUSIONS: Integrating clinical content with learning about educational methods is an efficient and effective approach to enhancing clinical faculty's capacity to model and teach clinical care. This program offers an educational model that engages practitioners, stimulates changes in practice, and offers opportunities for reflection and professional revitalization.
AD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. amy_sullivan@dfci.harvard.edu
PMID
15
TI
Improving residents' end-of-life communication skills with a short retreat: a randomized controlled trial.
AU
Szmuilowicz E, el-Jawahri A, Chiappetta L, Kamdar M, Block S
SO
J Palliat Med. 2010 Apr;13(4):439-52.
 
BACKGROUND: Internal medicine residents are largely unprepared to carry out end-of-life (EOL) conversations. There is evidence that these skills can be taught, but data from randomized controlled trials are lacking.
PURPOSE: We studied whether a day-long communication skills training retreat would lead to enhanced performance of and confidence with specific EOL conversations. We also studied the effect of the retreat on residents' ability to respond to patient emotions.
METHODS: PGY-2 resident volunteers were randomly assigned to a retreat group or a control group. The retreat involved a combination of teaching styles and skills practice with standardized patients. All participants completed questionnaires and were evaluated carrying out two types of conversations (breaking bad news or discussing direction of care) with a standardized patient before (T1) and after (T2) the intervention phase. Conversations were audio-taped and later rated by a researcher blinded to group assignment and time of assessment.
RESULTS: Forty-nine residents agreed to randomization (88%) with 23 residents randomized to the retreat group and 26 to the control group. Compared to controls, retreat participants demonstrated higher T2 scores for breaking bad news, discussing direction of care, and responding to emotion. Comparing T2 to T1, the retreat group's improvement in responding to emotion was statistically significant. The retreat group's confidence improved significantly only for the breaking bad news construct.
CONCLUSIONS: A short course for residents can significantly improve specific elements of resident EOL conversation performance, including the ability to respond to emotional cues.
AD
Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. eszmuilo@nmh.org
PMID
16
TI
A controlled trial of a short course to improve residents' communication with patients at the end of life.
AU
Alexander SC, Keitz SA, Sloane R, Tulsky JA
SO
Acad Med. 2006;81(11):1008.
 
PURPOSE: High-quality palliative care requires physicians who communicate effectively, yet many do not receive adequate training. Leading efforts to demonstrate the effectiveness of such training have involved time-intensive programs that included primarily attending physicians, which have been conducted outside of the United States. The goal was to evaluate the effect of a short course to improve residents' communication skills delivering bad news and eliciting patients' preferences for end-of-life care.
METHOD: This prospective trial enrolled internal medicine residents at Duke University Medical Center from 1999 to 2001. The course consisted of small-group teaching with lecture, discussion, and role-play. The outcome measure was observed communication skills delivering bad news and eliciting patients' preferences for end-of-life treatment, assessed via audio-recorded standardized patient encounters before and after receiving the intervention.
RESULTS: Thirty-seven residents received the intervention and 19 were in the control group. Residents attending the course demonstrated statistically significant increases in their overall skill ratings in the delivery of bad news, with improvement in the specific areas of information giving and responding to emotional cues. Although cumulative scores for discussions about patient preferences for treatment did not increase, residents demonstrated enhanced specific skills including discussing probability, presenting clinical scenarios, and asking about prior experience with end-of-life decision making.
CONCLUSION: A relatively short, intensive course can improve the end-of-life communication skills of U.S. medical residents.
AD
Durham VA Medical Center, North Carolina, USA. alexa054@mc.duke.edu
PMID
17
TI
Creating enduring change: demonstrating the long-term impact of a faculty development program in palliative care.
AU
Sullivan AM, Lakoma MD, Billings JA, Peters AS, Block SD, PCEP Core Faculty
SO
J Gen Intern Med. 2006 Sep;21(9):907-14.
 
BACKGROUND: Improved educational and evaluation methods are needed in continuing professional development programs.
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the long-term impact of a faculty development program in palliative care education and practice.
DESIGN: Longitudinal self-report surveys administered from April 2000 to April 2005.
PARTICIPANTS: Physician and nurse educators from North America and Europe. All program graduates (n = 156) were invited to participate.
INTERVENTION: Two-week program offered annually (2000 to 2003) with 2 on-site sessions and 6-month distance-learning period. Learner-centered training addressed teaching methods, clinical skill development, and organizational and professional development.
MEASURES: Self-administered survey items assessing behaviors and attitudes related to palliative care teaching, clinical care, and organizational and professional development at pre-, postprogram, and long-term (6, 12, or 18 months) follow-up.
RESULTS: Response rates: 96% (n = 149) preprogram, 73% (n = 114) follow-up. Participants reported increases in: time spent in palliative care practice (38% preprogram, 47% follow-up, P<.01); use of learner-centered teaching approaches (sum of 8 approaches used "a lot": preprogram 0.7 +/- 1.1, follow-up 3.1 +/- 2.0, P<.0001); and palliative care topics taught (sum of 11 topics taught "a lot": preprogram 1.6 +/- 2.0, follow-up 4.9 +/- 2.9, P<.0001). Reported clinical practices in psychosocial dimensions of care improved (e.g., assessed psychosocial needs of patient who most recently died: 68% preprogram, 85% follow-up, P = .01). Nearly all (90%) reported launching palliative care initiatives, and attributed their success to program participation. Respondents reported major improvements in confidence, commitment to palliative care, and enthusiasm for teaching. Eighty-two percent reported the experience as "transformative."
CONCLUSIONS: This evidence of enduring change provides support for the potential of this educational model to have measurable impact on practices and professional development of physician and nurse educators.
AD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 01984, USA. amy_sullivan@dfci.harvard.edu
PMID