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Medline ® Abstracts for References 11-13

of 'Discussing goals of care'

11
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Truth may hurt but deceit hurts more: communication in palliative care.
AU
Fallowfield LJ, Jenkins VA, Beveridge HA
SO
Palliat Med. 2002;16(4):297.
 
Healthcare professionals often censor their information giving to patients in an attempt to protect them from potentially hurtful, sad or bad news. There is a commonly expressed belief that what people do not know does not harm them. Analysis of doctor and nurse/patient interactions reveals that this well-intentioned but misguided assumption about human behaviour is present at all stages of cancer care. Less than honest disclosure is seen from the moment that a patient reports symptoms, to the confirmation of diagnosis, during discussions about the therapeutic benefits of treatment, at relapse and terminal illness. This desire to shield patients from the reality of their situation usually creates even greater difficulties for patients, their relatives and friends and other members of the healthcare team. Although the motivation behind economy with the truth is often well meant, a conspiracy of silence usually results in a heightened state of fear, anxiety and confusion--not one of calm and equanimity. Ambiguous or deliberately misleading information may afford short-term benefits while things continue to go well, but denies individuals and their families opportunities to reorganize and adapt their lives towards the attainment of more achievable goals, realistic hopes and aspirations. In this paper, some examples and consequences of accidental, deliberate, if well-meaning, attemptsto disguise the truth from patients, taken verbatim from interviews, are given, together with cases of unintentional deception or misunderstandings created by the use of ambiguous language. We also provide evidence from research studies showing that although truth hurts, deceit may well hurt more. 'I think the best physician is the one who has the providence to tell to the patients according to his knowledge the present situation, what has happened before, and what is going to happen in the future' (Hippocrates).
AD
Psychosocial Oncology Group (Cancer Research UK), School of Biological Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK. l.fallowfield@biols.susx.ac.uk
PMID
12
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Cancer patient preferences for communication of prognosis in the metastatic setting.
AU
Hagerty RG, Butow PN, Ellis PA, Lobb EA, Pendlebury S, Leighl N, Goldstein D, Lo SK, Tattersall MH
SO
J Clin Oncol. 2004 May;22(9):1721-30.
 
PURPOSE: To identify preferences for and predictors of prognostic information among patients with incurable metastatic cancer.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred twenty-six metastatic cancer patients seeing 30 oncologists at 12 outpatient clinics in New South Wales, Australia, participated in the study. Patients were diagnosed with incurable metastatic disease within 6 weeks to 6 months of recruitment. Patients completed a survey eliciting their preferences for prognostic information, including type, quantity, mode, and timing of presentation; anxiety and depression levels; and information and involvement preferences.
RESULTS: More than 95% of patients wanted information about side effects, symptoms, and treatment options. The majority wanted to know longest survival time with treatment (85%), 5-year survival rates (80%), and average survival (81%). Words and numbers were preferred over pie charts or graphs. Fifty-nine percent (59%) wanted to discuss expected survival when first diagnosed with metastatic disease. Thirty-eight percent and 44% wanted to negotiate when expected survival and dying, respectively, were discussed. Patients with higher depression scores were more likely to want to know shortest time to live without treatment (P =.047) and average survival (P =.049). Lower depression levels were significantly associated with never wanting to discuss expected survival (P =.03). Patients with an expected survival of years were more likely to want to discuss life expectancy when first diagnosed with metastases (P =.02).
CONCLUSION: Most metastatic cancer patients want detailed prognostic information but prefer to negotiate the extent, format, and timing of the information they receive from their oncologists.
AD
Medical Psychology Research Unit and Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
PMID
13
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When the treatment goal is not cure: are cancer patients equipped to make informed decisions?
AU
Gattellari M, Voigt KJ, Butow PN, Tattersall MH
SO
J Clin Oncol. 2002;20(2):503.
 
PURPOSE: Informed decision making now is considered the underpinning of ethical medical practice. We aimed to determine the extent to which patients with incurable cancer are adequately informed of their prognosis and treatment options and encouraged to participate in treatment decisions.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred eighteen cancer patients with incurable disease presenting for an initial consultation with one of nine oncologists at two Sydney tertiary referral hospitals participated in the study. Consultations were recorded on audiotape to permit a content analysis of doctor-patient interactions. We devised a coding system to assess disclosure of information and to evaluate doctor encouragement of patient participation in treatment decision making. Patient recall, satisfaction, anxiety, and perceptions of the decision-making process were assessed to determine the effects of informed decision making on patient outcomes.
RESULTS: Most patients were informed about the aim of anticancer treatment (84.7%), that their disease was incurable (74.6%), and about life expectancy (57.6%). An alternative to anticancer treatments was presented to 44.1%, 36.4% were informed about how anticancer treatment would affect quality of life, and 29.7% were offered a management choice. Oncologists checked patient understanding in only 10.2% of consultations. Although greater information disclosure did not seem to elevate anxiety levels, greater patient participation in the decision-making process was associated with increased anxiety levels (P =.0005), which persisted over a 2-week time span.
CONCLUSION: Most patients were well informed, but important gaps remain, especially concerning information about prognosis and alternatives to anticancer treatment. These gaps invite the question concerning whether patients are led toward anticancer treatment.
AD
Medical Psychology Unit and Department of Cancer, University of Sydney, and Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. mgat9321@mail.usyd.edu.au
PMID