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Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis immunization in children 7 through 18 years of age

Author
Jan E Drutz, MD
Section Editors
Teresa K Duryea, MD
Morven S Edwards, MD
Deputy Editor
Mary M Torchia, MD

INTRODUCTION

Childhood and adolescent immunizations are one of the most effective means of preventing serious illness. Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis immunization in children and adolescents 7 through 18 years of age will be discussed here. Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis immunization in children zero through six years of age and other childhood immunizations are discussed separately. (See "Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis immunization in infants and children 0 through 6 years of age" and "Standard immunizations for children and adolescents".)

BACKGROUND

Diphtheria is an acute respiratory or cutaneous illness caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Respiratory diphtheria has a case fatality rate of 5 to 10 percent [1]. (See "Epidemiology and pathophysiology of diphtheria" and "Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of diphtheria".)

Tetanus is a nervous system disorder characterized by muscle spasms. It is caused by Clostridium tetani, a toxin-producing anaerobe. Mortality is increased among unvaccinated persons [2]. (See "Tetanus".)

Pertussis, or "whooping cough," is an acute respiratory illness caused by Bordetella pertussis. The case fatality rate for pertussis is approximately 0.2 percent; mortality is increased among infants younger than three months of age. (See "Pertussis infection in adolescents and adults: Clinical manifestations and diagnosis" and "Pertussis infection in infants and children: Clinical features and diagnosis".)

VACCINES

Vaccines for diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis were introduced into the routine childhood immunization schedule in the United States during the 1940s, with dramatic effects on disease incidence (figure 1A and figure 1B and figure 2) [1-3].

                                

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Literature review current through: Nov 2016. | This topic last updated: Tue May 10 00:00:00 GMT+00:00 2016.
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