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Date rape: Risk factors and prevention

Authors
Constance M Wiemann, PhD
Samantha D Harrykissoon, JD, MPH
Section Editor
Amy B Middleman, MD, MPH, MS Ed
Deputy Editor
Mary M Torchia, MD

INTRODUCTION

The epidemiology, risk factors, and prevention of date rape will be discussed here. The identification and management of date rape, sexual abuse, and the evaluation and management of sexual assault are discussed separately. (See "Date rape: Identification and management" and "Evaluation of sexual abuse in children and adolescents" and "Management and sequelae of sexual abuse in children and adolescents" and "Evaluation and management of adult sexual assault victims".)

TERMINOLOGY

Sexual assault – Sexual assault is an inclusive term that refers to any form of forced or inappropriate unwanted sexual contact ranging from forced touching or kissing to verbally or physically coerced vaginal, oral, or anal penetration [1-3]. This includes situations in which the victim is unable to consent because of intoxication, inability to understand the consequences, misperceptions because of age, or other incapacities.

Rape – The legal definition of rape varies from state to state [4]. It generally encompasses nonconsensual vaginal, anal, or oral penetration that involves force or threat of force (physical or psychological), lack of consent, or inability to provide consent because of age, intoxication, or mental status [4-7]. Rape is categorized according to the relationship between the perpetrator and the victim.

Stranger rape describes nonconsensual sexual penetration between individuals who do not know each other before the sexual act [7].

Acquaintance rape describes nonconsensual sexual penetration between individuals who know each other in some capacity before the sexual act [7].

                       

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Literature review current through: Nov 2016. | This topic last updated: Tue Jul 05 00:00:00 GMT+00:00 2016.
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