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Medline ® Abstracts for References 1-5

of 'Cutaneous side effects of conventional chemotherapy agents'

1
TI
Mucocutaneous reactions to chemotherapy.
AU
Susser WS, Whitaker-Worth DL, Grant-Kels JM
SO
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999;40(3):367.
 
UNLABELLED: Chemotherapeutic agents are a widely used treatment modality. Side effects range from common to unusual and may be confused with other cutaneous sequelae of oncologic treatment. The goal of this communication is to elaborate on previous descriptions of the cutaneous manifestations of chemotherapeutic treatment and to discuss more recent findings.
LEARNING OBJECTIVE: At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants should be able to generate a differential diagnosis of possible etiologies for varying patterns of cutaneous involvement in patients receiving chemotherapy and identify the various cutaneous side effects of chemotherapeutic treatment. In addition, they should be able to distinguish life-threatening side effects that require immediate management from more benign manifestations of chemotherapeutic treatment.
AD
Department of Dermatology, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, USA.
PMID
2
TI
Cutaneous reactions to recombinant cytokine therapy.
AU
Asnis LA, Gaspari AA
SO
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1995;33(3):393.
 
Cytokines are critical to several fundamental homeostatic mechanisms such as fever, acute phase reactions, wound healing, hematopoiesis, inflammation, cellular and humoral immune responses, and tumor regression. As a result of advances in recombinant DNA technology, recombinant cytokines are available as therapeutic agents. They have been used for metastatic cancers and immunodeficiencies, as a therapy for naturally occurring or drug-induced anemias or leukopenias, and they have also been applied to some cutaneous disorders. Cytokine therapy can result in toxic reactions that affect many organ systems, especially the skin. These reactions are common and diverse, ranging from minor injection site reactions, pruritus, and flushing to life-threatening autoimmune disorders, severe erythroderma, or bullous skin reactions. This review focuses on the major cytokines that are in current clinical use or under investigation and describes the cutaneous complications of these agents.
AD
Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY, USA.
PMID
3
TI
Cutaneous reactions to chemotherapy drugs: the art of consultation.
AU
Remlinger KA
SO
Arch Dermatol. 2003;139(1):77.
 
AD
Department of Dermatology, Rush-Presbyterian-St Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. CPAMD@worldnet.att.net
PMID
4
TI
Dermatologic toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents.
AU
Payne AS, James WD, Weiss RB
SO
Semin Oncol. 2006;33(1):86.
 
Due to its high metabolic rate, skin represents one of the major target organs of chemotherapy-associated toxicity. Reactions range from common, nonspecific exanthematous eruptions to rare but distinctive cutaneous lesions that may not become apparent until a drug transitions from clinical trials to widespread oncologic use. The challenge of the physician is to recognize reaction patterns that reflect a drug reaction, identify a likely causative drug, and determine whether the reaction is a dose-limiting toxicity. This review will focus on the cutaneous side effects of the newer classes of chemotherapy drugs, including targeted monoclonal antibody therapy and small molecule inhibitors.
AD
Department of Dermatology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. aimee.payne@uphs.upenn.edu
PMID
5
TI
Cutaneous reactions to chemotherapeutic drugs and targeted therapies for cancer: part I. Conventional chemotherapeutic drugs.
AU
Reyes-Habito CM, Roh EK
SO
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014 Aug;71(2):203.e1-203.e12; quiz 215-6.
 
Conventional chemotherapy continues to be an important part of cancer management, but may cause various cutaneous reactions because it disturbs specific cell cycle phases. The alkylating agents cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and thiotepa can produce hyperpigmentation, while hypersensitivity reactions can be seen with platinum alkylating agents. Antimetabolites vary in reactions from exanthematous to bullous skin lesions. 5-fluorouracil and its derivatives and liposomal doxorubicin and daunorubicin are characteristically known to cause hand-foot syndrome, while bleomycin can cause fibrosis and flagellate dermatitis. Several hypersensitivity reactions may also occur from mitotic inhibitors and topoisomerase inhibitors. These different characteristic presentations are important to dermatologists in identifying the correct diagnosis and management for the cancer patient.
AD
PMID