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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 13

of 'Complications of abdominal surgical incisions'

13
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Subcutaneous tissue approximation in relation to wound disruption after cesarean delivery in obese women.
AU
Naumann RW, Hauth JC, Owen J, Hodgkins PM, Lincoln T
SO
Obstet Gynecol. 1995;85(3):412.
 
OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that closure of the subcutaneous fat decreases the incidence of wound disruption after cesarean delivery.
METHODS: Two hundred forty-five women with at least 2 cm of subcutaneous fat were randomized to closure of the Camper fascia or no closure with cesarean delivery.
RESULTS: Complications leading to disruption or opening of the incision were classified as wound seromas in 28 women (11.4%) and as wound infections in 17 (7.0%). The relative risk (RR) of seroma formation in the subcutaneous closure group was 0.3 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.1-0.7 (5.1 versus 17.2%), a statistically significant difference. There was no significant difference in the incidence of wound infections in the two study groups. Overall, there was a significant difference in the incidence of wound disruption from all causes between the two groups: 14.5% in the subcutaneous closure group compared with 26.6% when the subcutaneous tissues were not reapproximated (RR 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-0.9).
CONCLUSION: Closure of the subcutaneous tissue can significantly reduce the rate of postoperative wound disruption in women with at least 2 cm of subcutaneous adipose tissue.
AD
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Alabama at Birmingham.
PMID