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Medline ® Abstracts for References 104,105

of 'Clostridium difficile infection in adults: Clinical manifestations and diagnosis'

104
TI
Incidence of Clostridium difficile infection in inflammatory bowel disease.
AU
Rodemann JF, Dubberke ER, Reske KA, Seo DH, Stone CD
SO
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2007;5(3):339.
 
BACKGROUND&AIMS: Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) rates have been increasing. We sought to determine whether CDAD incidence has increased specifically in hospitalized patients with IBD. We also explored possible differences in the risk for and time to presentation of CDAD between IBD and non-IBD patients.
METHODS: We analyzed hospital admissions from 1998-2004 for demographics, length of stay, C difficile infections, and time from admission to a positive C difficile test. We calculated CDAD incidence for non-IBD, all IBD, CD, and UC admissions and used logistic regression to estimate the risk for CDAD.
RESULTS: CDAD incidence increased in each group and was higher in all IBD than non-IBD groups. During the observation period, CDAD rates approximately doubled in CD (9.5 to 22.3/1000 admissions) and tripled in UC (18.4 to 57.6/1000). Length of stay was similar among the groups. For all years combined, the adjusted odds ratios for CDAD in all IBD, CD, and UC admissions were 2.9 (95% confidence interval, 2.1-4.1), 2.1 (1.3-3.4), and 4.0 (2.4-6.6), respectively. The median times from admission to a positive C difficile test result for non-IBD, CD, and UC were 4.0, 0.8, and 0.5 days, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: CDAD incidence in IBD has increased and is higher than in the non-IBD population. IBD and UC patients in particular have a higher risk for CDAD. C difficile infections in IBD are confirmed predominantly within 48 hours of admission, suggesting most were acquired before hospitalization.
AD
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA.
PMID
105
TI
Impact of Clostridium difficile on inflammatory bowel disease.
AU
Issa M, Vijayapal A, Graham MB, Beaulieu DB, Otterson MF, Lundeen S, Skaros S, Weber LR, Komorowski RA, Knox JF, Emmons J, Bajaj JS, Binion DG
SO
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2007;5(3):345.
 
BACKGROUND& AIMS: Clostridium difficile-associated disease has increased significantly in North American medical centers. The impact of C difficile on patients with IBD (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis) at the present time is unknown.
METHODS: A retrospective, observational study evaluating IBD patients followed in a referral center to evaluate the impact of C difficile was performed. Diagnosis was confirmed with stool toxin analysis. Demographic information, diagnosis, anatomic location, IBD therapy, antibiotic exposure, hospitalizations, and surgeries were recorded. Available endoscopic and histologic data were evaluated.
RESULTS: Rate of C difficile infection increased from 1.8% of IBD patients in 2004 to 4.6% in 2005 (P<.01). Proportion of IBD patients within the total number of C difficile infections at our institution increased from 7% in 2004 to 16% in 2005 (P<.01). IBD colonic involvement was found in the majority of C difficile-infected patients in 2005 (91%), and the majority contracted infection as an outpatient (76%). Antibiotic exposure was identified in 61% of IBD patients with C difficile infection in 2005. Pseudomembranes and fibrinopurulent eruptions were not seen endoscopically or histologically. During 2004-2005 more than half of the infected IBD patients required hospitalization, and 20% required colectomy. Univariate and multivariate analysis identified maintenance immunomodulator use and colonic involvement as independent risk factors for C difficile infection in IBD.
CONCLUSIONS: C difficile infection has increased significantly in IBD patients and negatively impacts clinical outcome. Increased vigilance regarding this infection in IBD patients with colitis activity is warranted.
AD
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226, USA.
PMID