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Medline ® Abstracts for References 1-3

of 'Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of oral allergy syndrome (pollen-food allergy syndrome)'

1
TI
A survey on the management of pollen-food allergy syndrome in allergy practices.
AU
Ma S, Sicherer SH, Nowak-Wegrzyn A
SO
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003;112(4):784.
 
BACKGROUND: There is no consensus on the diagnosis and therapy of oral allergy syndrome (OAS; also known as pollen-food allergy syndrome), a disorder caused by IgE antibody-mediated reactions to homologous proteins in pollens and fruits and vegetables.
OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine how practicing allergists define and treat OAS.
METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed to 226 randomly selected US allergists from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology directory.
RESULTS: One hundred twenty-two (54%) returned surveys were analyzed. Median estimates of the prevalence of OAS among the patients with pollen allergy were 5% among children and 8% among adults. Twenty percent of allergists reported that some patients progressed to systemic symptoms. Fifty-three percent of allergists recommended complete avoidance of causal foods to all patients, whereas 9% did not advocate any restrictions. Thirty percent never prescribed epinephrine for OAS, 3% always did, and the remainder did so on the basis of symptoms. When presented with clinical cases, 20% diagnosed systemic reactions to peach as OAS, 13% believed peanut could cause OAS, and 25% did not prescribe epinephrine for peanut allergy manifested by oral symptoms.
CONCLUSION: Allergists' estimates of the prevalence of OAS in patients with pollen allergy (5%-8%) are lower than the prevalence reported (approximately 50%) in the published studies of these patients, perhaps reflecting a low index of suspicion, underdiagnosis, or both. The wide range of responses regarding diagnosis and management indicates the need for a better definition for the disorder and standard therapeutic guidelines. Discrepancies might be related to the term OAS, and therefore use of the more specific term "pollen-food allergy syndrome" is suggested.
AD
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy and Immunology, New York, NY 10029, USA.
PMID
2
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Pollen-food syndromes associated with weed pollinosis: an update from the molecular point of view.
AU
Egger M, Mutschlechner S, Wopfner N, Gadermaier G, Briza P, Ferreira F
SO
Allergy. 2006;61(4):461.
 
Pollinosis patients often display adverse reactions upon the ingestion of plant-derived foods as a result of immunoglobulin E (IgE) cross-reactive structures shared by pollen and food allergen sources. The symptoms of such pollen-food syndromes (PFS) or class 2 food allergies range from local oral allergy syndrome to severe systemic anaphylaxis. Two clinical syndromes, the celery-mugwort-spice syndrome and the mugwort-mustard-allergy syndrome have been described in association with weed pollinosis. However, other associations between weed pollinosis and hypersensitivity to certain kinds of food have also been observed, like the mugwort-peach, the ragweed-melon-banana, the plantain-melon, the pellitory-pistachio, the goosefoot-fruit, the Russian thistle-saffron, and the hop-celery association. The number of allergen sources involved, the allergens, and influencing factors including geography, diet, and food preparation contribute to the high clinical complexity of PFS. So far, known causative cross-reactive allergens include profilins, lipid transfer proteins, and high-molecular weight allergens and/or glycoallergens. The current usage of nonstandardized allergen extracts poses additional problems for both diagnosis and therapy of PFS patients. Further identification and characterization of involved allergens is inescapable for better understanding of PFS and vaccine development. Panels of recombinant allergens and/or hypo-allergens are promising tools to improve both PFS diagnostics and therapy.
AD
Department of Molecular Biology, Division of Allergy and Immunology, University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria.
PMID
3
TI
Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of food allergy in the United States: report of the NIAID-sponsored expert panel.
AU
NIAID-Sponsored Expert Panel, Boyce JA, Assa'ad A, Burks AW, Jones SM, Sampson HA, Wood RA, Plaut M, Cooper SF, Fenton MJ, Arshad SH, Bahna SL, Beck LA, Byrd-Bredbenner C, Camargo CA Jr, Eichenfield L, Furuta GT, Hanifin JM, Jones C, Kraft M, Levy BD, Lieberman P, Luccioli S, McCall KM, Schneider LC, Simon RA, Simons FE, Teach SJ, Yawn BP, Schwaninger JM
SO
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010;126(6 Suppl):S1.
 
Food allergy is an important public health problem that affects children and adults and may be increasing in prevalence. Despite the risk of severe allergic reactions and even death, there is no current treatment for food allergy: the disease can only be managed by allergen avoidance or treatment of symptoms. The diagnosis and management of food allergy also may vary from one clinical practice setting to another. Finally, because patients frequently confuse nonallergic food reactions, such as food intolerance, with food allergies, there is an unfounded belief among the public that food allergy prevalence is higher than it truly is. In response to these concerns, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, working with 34 professional organizations, federal agencies, and patient advocacy groups, led the development of clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and management of food allergy. These Guidelines are intended for use by a wide variety of health care professionals, including family practice physicians, clinical specialists, and nurse practitioners. The Guidelines include a consensus definition for food allergy, discuss comorbid conditions often associated with food allergy, and focus on both IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated reactions to food. Topics addressed include the epidemiology, natural history, diagnosis, and management of food allergy, as well as the management of severe symptoms and anaphylaxis. These Guidelines provide 43 concise clinical recommendations and additional guidance on points of current controversy in patient management. They also identify gaps in the current scientific knowledge to be addressed through future research.
AD
Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
PMID